Poetry
The Latin Site - Poetry
Home Page
Quid Novi?
Nota Bene/Grammar
Authors
Certamen
Literature
Mythology
Phrases
Poetry
Quotes
Links
JCL
Guestbook
Message Board
Members' Area
Site Tree
Rhetorical Devices | Scansion
Alliteration
The repetition of the same constant sound at the beginning of at least two consecutive words in a line.
Ex. magno cum murmure montis

Anaphora
Repetition of the same word at the beginning of two or more consecutive clauses.
Ex. passer mortuus est meae puellae, passer, deliciae meae puellae,

Anastrophe
The inversion of the usual order of words.
Nota Bene: There is a very important differnce between Anastrophe and Hysteron Proteron - the latter is the inversion of the logical/natural order of words
Ex. Te propter instead of propter te.

Antithesis
Two contrasting ideas in juxtaposition.
Ex. Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.

Aposiopesis
Breaking off before the close of a sentence.
Ex. Quos ego---sed motos praestat componere fluctus.

Apostrophe
Addressing a person who is not present or an inanimate object.
Ex. Hello soup, you're looking soup-er today.

Assonance
Repetition of vowel sounds.
Ex. protinus alter amat, fugit altera nomen amantis
Nota Bene: Here, both the al- and am- sounds are repeated.

Asyndeton
Omitting necessary conjunctions
Ex. te propter instead of propter te

Chiasmus
ABBA order of words or ideas.
Ex. Nicaeaeque ager uber aestuosae:

Ellipsis
Omitting a word
Ex. te propter instead of propter te

Epithet
An adjective that describes a person
Ex. Pater Aeneas (Father Aeneas)

Euphemism
Replacing a word with harsh word with a mild one.
Ex. Saying "passed away" instead of dead.

Hendiadys
An expression using two nouns connected by "and."
Ex. te propter instead of propter te

Hyperbole
An exaggeration.
Ex. O Danaum fortissime gentis Tydide!

Hysteron Proteron
Inversion of the logical/natural order of words/ideas
Ex. te propter instead of propter te

Litotes
The use of a double negative.
Ex. Not large (small)

Metaphor
An implied comparison.
Ex. Marcus is a fierce lion.

Metonymy
Replacing a word wih another it represents.
Ex. Using Ceres instead of grain.

Oxymoron
Contradicting words in juxtaposition.
Ex. te propter instead of propter te

Pleonasm
Unnecessary fullness of expression.
Ex. Atra nox (black night)

Polyptoton
Repition of the same word with changes in the endings of the word
Ex. culte puer puerique parens Amathusia culti,

Polysyndeton
Use of unnecessary conjunctions.
Ex. et vino et sale et omnibus cachinnis.

Praeterition
Omitting something to emphasize it.
Ex. te propter instead of propter te

Simile
A comparision using "like" or "as."
Nota Bene: Such clauses in Latin usually begin with "qualis."
Ex. Qualis apes aestate nova per florea rura exercet sub sole labor

Synchesis
Interlocking word order.
Ex. gaudens innuptaeque aemula Phoebas

Synecdoche
Use of part for the whole.
Ex. Using puppis (stern) to represent navis (ship)

Syncopation
Shortening a word to preserve the meter.
Ex. Deum instead of deorum.

Tmesis
Seperating parts of a compound word with one or more words.
Ex. te propter instead of propter te

Zeugma
Using a verb with two or more nouns, with the verb only explicitly applying to one of them.
Ex. te propter instead of propter te

Every syllable is either long or short.
The first syllable is always long.


To determine when a syllable is long:

Long by nature:
A syllable is long by nature when it:
  • Contains a vowel marked long,
  • Contains a diphthong,
  • Or is in a case that is long.
Hosting by WebRing.