A Brief History of Bulahdelah
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WHERE IS BULAHDELAH?

Bulahdelah is located on the banks of the Myall River. It straddles the Pacific Highway about 300 kilometres north of Sydney and is the gateway to Australia's Great Lakes district.

Mountain Colour.

MOUNTAIN FIRST RECORDED

*Lt. John Oxley a crown surveyor, first recorded the mountain in 1818, and it was named Bulladella Mountain. It is a prominent landmark easily seen from the sea and, at the time, marked the most northern boundary for convicts and bonded persons.

AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURAL COMPANY

In 1825, the Australian Agricultural Company was formed in London and applied for land grants covering an area from Port Stephens in the south to the Manning in the north, inland to Gloucester and including Stroud, the Karuah River and the Myall Lakes.

*In 1826, a large land grant was given to the Australian Agricultural Company that extended from the Manning River to Port Stephens and west to Barrington Tops.

Due to the lack of knowledge of the region, Sir Edward Parry was commissioned to survey the land in 1830. From June 3d to 6th he wrote of his visit to the area, made reference to the hill known by the Aboriginals as Boola-deela, and wrote of crossing the Crawford and Myall Rivers.

One of Parry's tasks was to determine the agricultural prospects of the region, particularly in relation to sheep. He did not view the land east of the Crawford / Girvan anticline (Cabbage Tree Mountain Range) with much favour.

*By 1830, the Company was aware that the coastal half of the grant would be unprofitable for pastoral development, and surrendered it for land elsewhere.

TIMBER

Private application for timber grants started for the region in 1833. On September 20th, 1836, John Edward Stacy applied for a timber grant at the approximate location of the present town.

In 1837, the coastal area reverted to the Crown, which tried to encourage settlers. In 1838, advertisements in Sydney calling for settlers for the region received no applications.

From 1833 to 1853, many timber grants were granted in the region. Much of the timber cut, was hauled down the river to supply a rapidly - growing boat building industry on the Myall Lakes.

*Source: "Alum Mountain, Bulahdelah.", by the Late Mr. Ted Baker.

Copyright 2000, Malcolm Carrall, Archives Officer, The Bulahdelah & Districts Historical Society Inc., 20 Ann Street, Bulahdelah, New South Wales, Australia, 2423. Original content in these Web pages is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be produced by any process or any other exclusive right exercised without written permission from the copyright holder. Published by Malcolm Carrall.

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