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Endymion, Book 4, Page 7
by John Keats (April to November, 1817).

"Within his car, aloft, young Bacchus stood,
Trifling his ivy-dart, in dancing mood,
                  With sidelong laughing;
And little rills of crimson vine imbru'd
His plump white arms, and shoulders, enough white
                  For Venus' pearly bite:
And near him rode Silenus on his ass,
Pelted with flowers as he on did pass
                  Tipsily quaffing.

"Whence came ye, merry Damsels! whence came ye!
So many, and so many, and such glee?
Why have ye left your bowers desolate,
                  Your lutes, and gentler fate?—
'We follow Bacchus! Bacchus on the wing,
                  A conquering!
Bacchus, young Bacchus! good or ill betide,
We dance before him thorough kingdoms wide:—
Come hither, lady fair, and joined be
                  To our wild minstrelsy!'

"Whence came ye, jolly Satyrs! whence came ye!
So many, and so many, and such glee?
Why have ye left your forest haunts, why left
                  Your nuts in oak-tree cleft?—
'For wine, for wine we left our kernel tree;
For wine we left our heath, and yellow brooms,
                  And cold mushrooms;
For wine we follow Bacchus through the earth;
Great God of breathless cups and chirping mirth!—
Come hither, lady fair, and joined be
                  To our mad minstrelsy!'

"Over wide streams and mountains great we went,
And, save when Bacchus kept his ivy tent,
Onward the tiger and the leopard pants,
                  With Asian elephants:
Onward these myriads—with song and dance,
With zebras striped, and sleek Arabians' prance,
Web-footed alligators, crocodiles,
Bearing upon their scaly backs, in files,
Plump infant laughers mimicking the coil
Of seamen, and stout galley-rowers' toil:
With toying oars and silken sails they glide,
                  Nor care for wind and tide.


PAGE 7 OF 16.

• • • • •Dearest Romantic, to read the eighth page of Endymion, Book 4,
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AUTHOR: John Keats (April to November, 1817).
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TITLE OF WEBSITE: Poetic SpacePUBLISHER: Lannie Brockstein
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