Poetic Space ||| About |||| Guestbook |||| Etherealism Literary Journal |||| Library ||| The Poet as Flourishing
Forums ||| Chat Rooms ||| The Wanderlust Poets Society ||| Links ||| Contact ||| Stores
John Keats
Poetry ||| Letters |||| Portraits |||| Biography |||| Astrology Chart |||| Books ||| Links

Endymion, Book 1, Page 7
by John Keats (April to November, 1817).

    "Thou, to whom every faun and satyr flies
For willing service; whether to surprise
The squatted hare while in half sleeping fit;
Or upward ragged precipices flit
To save poor lambkins from the eagle's maw;
Or by mysterious enticement draw
Bewildered shepherds to their path again;
Or to tread breathless round the frothy main,
And gather up all fancifullest shells
For thee to tumble into Naiad's cells,
And, being hidden, laugh at their out-peeping;
Or to delight thee with fantastic leaping,
The while they pelt each other on the crown
With silvery oak apples, and fir cones brown—
By all the echoes that about thee ring,
Hear us, O satyr king!

    "O Hearkener to the loud clapping shears,
While ever and anon to his shorn peers
A ram goes bleating: Winder of the horn,
When snouted wild boars routing tender corn
Anger our huntsmen: Breather round our farms,
To keep off mildews, and all weather harms:
Strange ministrant of undescribed sounds,
That come a swooning over hollow grounds,
And wither drearily on barren moors:
Dread opener of the mysterious doors
Leading to universal knowledge—see,
Great son of Dryope,
The many that are come to pay their vows
With leaves about their brows!

    "Be still the unimaginable lodge
For solitary thinkings; such as dodge
Conception to the very bourne of heaven,
Then leave the naked brain: be still the leaven,
That spreading in this dull and clodded earth
Gives it a touch ethereal—a new birth:
Be still a symbol of immensity;
A firmament reflected in a sea;
An element filling the space between;
An unknown—but no more: we humbly screen
With uplift hands our foreheads, lowly bending,
And giving out a shout most heaven rending,
Conjure thee to receive our humble Pæan.
Upon thy Mount Lycean!"


PAGE 7 OF 16.

• • • • •Dearest Romantic, to read the eighth page of Endymion, Book 1,
kindly click on the link at the very bottom of this page.
• • • • •


• • • •To read poems by Other Horrible Workers (poets
in today's day and age, kindly click HERE.
• • • •

Bookmark and Share


• • • ATTENTION GOOD SCHOLARS!!! • • •
Information for How to Cite this Webpage:

AUTHOR: John Keats (April to November, 1817).
TITLE OF WEBPAGE: PoeticSpace:Keats:Poems:EndymionBook1:Page7
TITLE OF WEBSITE: Poetic SpacePUBLISHER: Lannie Brockstein
DATE PUBLISHED/LAST UPDATED: March 21 2014URL/WEBPAGE ADDRESS:
http://webspace.webring.com/people/tl/lanouvelledecadence/keapoemsend107.html

• • •Websites that provide examples or that generate citation for essays
in the styles of AMA, MLA, Chicago, Turabian, and more:
Study Guides and Strategies
Son of Citation Machinewikihow: How to Cite a Website• • •


• • •Permanently archive this page as it appears to you today,
for future academic reference, with WebCite.
• • •


• • • • •To read the eighth page of Endymion, Book 1, please click HERE.• • • • •
• • • • •To return to the Keats 'Poems' section, please click HERE.• • • • •
• • • •You are invited to discuss John Keats in our FORUMS!• • • •



Bookmark and Share

Poetic Space

All Rights Reserved.