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American Indian History. *****************************************************************

Genealogy My Family, a little History, some Pictures. Click here!
OR Choctaw Database Rootsweb
Sookie Story of my GGGGrandMother "Shakapahona". Click here!

"I think the Spirit, is the one thing we have to rely on. It has been handed to us as a live and precious coal. And each generation has to make that decision whether they want to blow on that coal to keep it alive or throw it away...Our language, our histories and culture are like a big ceremonial fire that's been kicked and stomped and scattered... Out in the darkness we can see those coals glowing. But our generation, whether in tribal government or wherever we find ourselves--Choctaw, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, Seminole-- are coal gatherers. We bring the coals back, assemble them and breathe on them again, so we can spark a flame, around which we might warm ourselves." Gary White Deer, Chickasaw 1994

CHOCTAW HISTORY
Go see Pushmataha's grave marker, Congressional Cemetery Washington, DC.
In 1824 Pushmataha, principal Chief of the Choctaw, accompanied by other tribal chiefs, visited Washington D.C., from their native lands of central Mississippi. They went to see Jackson and Lafayette. Desiring to see the great Frenchman, Pushmataha was led to his rooms, where through the aid of interpreters they had a long conversation. At parting, Pushmataha said, "We heard of you in our distant villages, we longed to see you, we have come, we have taken you by the hand. For the last time we look on the face of the great warrior whose fathers were the friends of our fathers. We go, it is the last time we shall meet, we shall both be in the land of shadows." Shortly afterwards the chief marched in a parade on a wet, cold, rainy day, caught the croup, and died 24 Dec. 1824. Before passing onto the land of shadows Jackson was summoned and stooping low over the bed to hear the dying warriors last words, "When I am dead, fire the big guns over me." His dying wish was carried out and he was buried in the Washington Congressional Cemetery, and for many years after a conclave of the Choctaw would gather at the grave and fire a 21 gun salute on the 24th of December. We should all remember.....
Pushmataha and the Sentry.
"If it had of been you General I would have used the sharp edge of the sword".

Pushmataha was succeeded by Netakacha, even as Pushmataha succeeded the great chief Pukshanubbee. According to his own belief he had no parents; the lightning struck a great oak and out jumped Pushmataha with his paint and feathers, as a full-fledged warrior, capable of leading this tribe! He was one of three medal chiefs of the Choctaw nation who was given the title and uniform of a general in the United States army in 1813, and in November of that year brought fifty-one warriors against the Creeks. Lieutenant Callahan directed the work of this little command of (indians), but it was Pushmataha who led them. Prior to this he won renown in every raid on the trans-Mississippi towns, always returning with scalps enough to decorate the village pole. Claiborne relates many incidents in the life of this (great indian leader), which cannot be overlooked. During his service against the Creeks, a soldier offered him some insult, when the chief struck him with the flat of his sword. General Claiborne told him that such a breach of discipline could not be permitted; but the stoical Indian related the character of the insult and concluded by stating: "Being only a private I struck him with the flat of my sword, but had it been you, general, I should have used the edge." On another occasion he discovered a soldier tied to a post and was told the fellow was drunk. The chief looked upon him as a martyr and , untying the prisoner, remarked, "Many great warriors get drunk." He was a polygamist of no mean character. Seeing what numbers of young warriors were annually swept away by war, he reasoned that those who were not killed should claim as many wives as possible, so that the strength of the nation may be kept up to a certain standard. His death took place immediately after his historical interview with General Lafayette, and while his old friend, General Andrew Jackson, looked on the dying warrior.




Some Choctaw Historical Facts
Choctaw Chiefs and their history.
Trail of Tears.
Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek.
Map of Tribal Locations

Map of SE Oklahoma

Map of SE Indian Territory
Map of Mississippi Land Cessions


"Part-Indian?"
There is no such thing as "part-Indian". Either you're Indian or you're not. It isn't
the quantity of Indian blood in your veins that is important, but the quality of it...
..your pride in it. I have seen full-bloods who have virtually no idea of the great legacy entrusted to their care. Yet, I have seen people with a little drop of Indian blood who inspire the spirits of their ancestors because they make being Indian a proud part of their everyday life. "word 'indian' was originally 'Cherokee'" by Jim Pell, Principal Chief of the North Alabama Cherokee Tribe


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