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Heinrich Haupt von Pappenheim
According to the Pappenheim web site, Heinrich Haupt was the founder and 1st Lord of Pappenheim - about the year 1130.  Who was this Heinrich Haupt and where did he come from?  See also Heinrich Kopf and Kopfsburg.

On Jan. 21, 2007, I may have discovered where he came from by doing some internet searches of documents/research available on the internet.

Heinrich Haupt was an Imperial Ministerial in Meissen, Saxony, Germany.  Another document indicates he was a Burggraf von Meissen in 1113.

Heinrich Haupt was associated with the release from prison of Count Wiprecht II (von Groitzsch).

Count Wiprecht II was imprisoned at Triefels in 1113 for being in opposition to Emperor Heinrich V since 1112.  He was sentenced to death but had this sentence commuted in exchange for all his lands.  Wiprecht III offered to exchange all his father's lands for his father's freedom 1113 - soon after being imprisoned.  The release would not occur until 1115.  Read more below.

Heinrich Haupt, Burggraf von Meissen (Count of the Castle), was taken prisoner on Feb. 11, 1115 during the Schlacht am Welfesholz (Battle of Welfesholz).  There was a dual between Count Hoyer I von Mansfield, Field Commander (loyal to Emperor Heinrich V) and Count Wiprecht III von Groitsch (loyal to the opposition under Lothar III).  Count Wiprecht III won the dual by killing Count Hoyer and took Heinrich Haupt (loyal to Heinrich V) as prisoner.

In 1115, Lothar III of Saxony defeated Emperor Heinrich V, and Wiprecht II was set free along with the exchange/release of Imperial Ministerial Heinrich Haupt, Burggraf von Meissen.  Wiprecht II received back all his rights and lands taken by Heinrich V.

All of this occuring during the 2nd Phase of the expansion of the Mark Meissen into the Frankish area of Bavaria (part of Bavaria north of the Danube) which began in 1105.

Later, it appears, Heinrich Haupt would be in Pappenheim by 1130.  This is likely to be a son of the Burggraf Heinrich Haupt above as the first Heinrich Haupt appears to have died about 1123.

Pappenheim is located in this Frankish area of Bavaria - located just north of the Danube.

The City of Meissen and the Town/Statelet of Pappenheim have a very close and intertwined connection over many, many years.  There have been many Counts von Pappenheim associated with Meissen and the rest of Saxony.  This may explain the original connection.

Ray Haupt
High Point, NC


Source Documents:
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Thiele Andreas: Tafel 181

"Erzahlende genealogische Stammtafeln zur europaischen Geschichte"
Band I, Teilband 1 Deutsche Kaiser-, Koenigs-, Herzogs-, und Grafenhauser I

Wiprecht II. (von Groitzsch)
+ 1118/23 (in Pegau)

http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/groitzsch_grafen_von/wiprecht_3_der_juengere_graf_von_groitzsch_
1116/wiprecht_3_der_juengere_graf_von_groitzsch_+_1116.html

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http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEISSEN.htm

B. Markgraf von Meissen 1123-1124 (Wiprecht II von Groitzsch)
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Fenske Lutz: Seite 53,65 A. 200,255-264.
"Adelsopposition und kirchlichen Reformbewegung im ostlichen Sachsen"

http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/groitzsch_grafen_von/wiprecht_2_der_aeltere_graf_von_groitzsch_
1124/fenske.html

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Other notes: Wipricht II was a son of Wipricht I im Balsamgau.  Wiprecht I was a son of Wulf.              
See much more below.
Return to Haupts of Pappenheim
Burg Meissen - circa 1575
The City of Meissen, Germany in 1575.  Look in the upper left corner.  Notice the left side of the oval.  There is black and white with crossing red swords.  Could this be where the black and white and crossing red swords come from on the Pappenheim Wappen (shield)? - Showing a relationship to Meissen?
Wappen of Pappenheim - 1340
Additional note:  Meissen is the home of the famous Meissen Porcelain.  Their symbol happens to the the same crossed swords.
The theoretical flag of the Kurfustentums (or Electorate) of Saxony.  The shield in the middle is the same shield depicted in the upper left of the Meissen painting above.  But notice, the black and white are reversed.  The black over white with crossed red swords now appears the same as in the Pappenheim wappen below.
The black over white diagonal squares w/red crossed swords clearly show a relationship to Meissen, Saxony.  The blue with silver/white helmets or "Eisenhutte" are the Pappenheim symbols.
See Heinrich Kopf of Eichenkofen and Kopfsburg
Return to Haupt History Page
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