This telegram was sent from General Herman Haupt to General Halleck (in Washington) and also to General Schenck (in Baltimore) at 12:45 am in the very early morning of July 1, 1863 - Day 1 of the Battle at Gettysburg.

Union Intelligence Report
General Haupt to Baltimore & Washington
Information just received, 12:45 A.M., leads to the belief that the concentration of the forces of the enemy will be at Gettysburg rather than Chambersburg.  The movement on their part is very rapid and hurried.  They returned from Carlisle in the direction of Gettysburg by way of the Petersburg Pike.  Firing about Petersburg and Dillsburg this p.m. continued some hours.  Meade should by all means be informed, and be prepared for a sudden attack from Lee's whole army.
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This telegram was sent from General Herman Haupt to General Halleck (in Washington) and also to General Schenck (in Baltimore) at 10:30 PM on June 30, 1863.

Lee is falling back suddenly from the vicinity of Harrisburg and concentrating all his forces.  York has been evacuated.  Carlisle is being evacuated.  The concentration appears to be at or near Chambersburg.  The object, apparently, a sudden movement against Meade, of which he should be advised by courier immediately.  A courier might reach Frederick by way of Western Maryland Railroad to Westminster.  This information comes from (Colonel) T.A. Scott, and I think it reliable.
According to Haupt (in his book Reminiscences of General Herman Haupt), "General Meade received both dispatches (in his tent) at 3:00 am (on July 1, 1863) by special courier from Westminster, as he subsequently informed me." Page 212 and 214.
A 3rd telegram was sent from General Herman Haupt to General Halleck (in Washington) at 6:00 am on July 1, 1863.

"I sent two telegrams last night and sent the same to General Schenck......"
If the O.R. is correct, Halleck responded and sent the 12:45 AM communication to Meade at 2:00 PM on July 1, 1863.  Halleck responded by way of Washington to Frederick and then a courier from Frederick to General Meade.  By this time the Battle had begun.

In order for Meade to have received these communications at 3:00 AM, they must have come through General Schenck (in Baltimore) and traveled from Baltimore to Westminster and then by courier to General Meade - just as Haupt states.
It should also be noted here that prior to the 1st telegram above and after Haupt arrived in Harrisburg, he met with Colonel T.A. Scott.  Scott had detected the movements of Lee's forces from around Harrisburg but had interpreted the movements to be a retreat.  Haupt replied, "You are entirely in error. These movements do not mean retreat; they mean concentration...."  After Haupt's explanation, Scott replied, "I think you are right." Haupt answered, "I am sure I am," and immediately wrote and forwarded the 10:30 PM (June 30) telegram above. See: Reminiscences, page 211 and 212.
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