Sixteenth
South Carolina
C.S.A.
Officers
Biographies

Captains
Sixteenth
South Carolina
C.S.A.



Captain A.J. Monroe
Company E

"Bonnie Blue Flag"



The Captains Consider the name,The Bloody Sixteenth

Captain C.M. Furman gave a cusory review of the history of the Sixteenth Regiment,"speaking of the engagements in which it took part, in its stay of eighteen months on the coast of S.C. following it in its career from Atlanta through North Georgia into Tennessee. In the distructive Battle of Franklin he said, every field officer of the regiment fell in the contest, and that at Jonesboro it rendered very valuable services to Hood's Army. He stated that the regiment received its cognomen of 'The Bloody Sixteen' in derision and for what it had not done but that it subsequently fairly earned the name. The fights in which it had participated were so numerous that no one had ever counted them, and that no other regiment had a more glorious record."

Captain McJunkin in his remarks, stated that the regiment took its name of 'The Bloody Sixteenth' from a scene presented in camp on a certain occasion from the bloody appearance caused by the slaughtering of 125 chickens." 8/15/83



Make certain that you note Captain Andrew Wilson and Captain George Holtzclaw. I would like to do this for each of these men, if you will help with information.

Can you provide additional biographical information?
batsonsm@bellsouth.net



Alexander, Richard H.
Captain
Company B

Wounded at Jonesboro, present at the surrender.

Machen Cemetery
Died 1870
Captain, Co. B/Co. E (16th-24th Consolidated) Born 2 July 1842 (Bible record) or Dec. 1841 (tombstone) and died Nov. 1870. He was a son of William Magness and Martha Ann McDaniel Alexander. He was wounded Sept. 1, 1864 near Palmetto, Ga. Paroled at Greensboro, NC on 2 May 1865. He was married to Sarah Elizabeth McKenzie. After his death, his wife married his brother Joseph Carson Alexander (also a soldier in Co. B, 16th SC Inf.).
Furman University
E-Mail Descendant
Babb, Newton
Captain
Company I

Newton Babb was from Fountain Inn or the lower part of Greenville County. He was born in 1830, the son of Abner Babb and Elizabeth Kellet. He had one child, M.A. Babb, born in 1850, died 1852. Captain Babb died 11/06/63 in LeGrange, Alabama of illness and is buried in Fairview Cemetery in Fountain Inn, S.C. He commanded Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina. Information provided by James Babb.

E-Mail Descendant

Grave of Fairview Presbyterian

Fairview Presbyterian Church, Newton Babb, Born 1/18/30, Died in Hospital, 1863.

Austin, J. Manning
Captain
Company A

Captain Austin died of illness in West Point, Georgia in July of 1862.

Christ Church Episcopal Cemetery, Joseph Manning Austin, Captain, First Company, Sixteenth S.C.V., Youngest son of Dr. W.L.M. and E.A. Austin, 7/28/62, aged 22 yrs.

Grave of Christ Church



Barnett, J.E.
Captain
Company H

Resigned at the 1862 reorganization, He is listed as a Class C, pension in the 1901 rolls. His age in 1901 is given as 69 and his residence as Merrittsville.

Glassy Mountain Baptist Cemetery, James Barnett, Born 12/27/22, Died 12/13/90.

Grave of

Photo John and Barbara Boling

Boling, John W.
Captain
Company G

Senior Captain, in command of regiment, after Franklin, until regiment consolidated. Wounded at Atlanta. Following the war, he served as a school trustee, a member of the Board of County Commissioners, and a member of the House of Representatives. Near the end of the war, Captain Boling came home to shoe his horse and the anvil turned over and broke his leg. He was a member of Ebenezer Church.

Confederate Odyssey
Grave of

Ebenezer Baptist Church Cemetery, J.W. Boling, Born 5/18/32, Died 12/29/96
Email descendant

Email descendant
Blakely, James, F.
Captain
Company F

Resigned 5/62
Was probably a Club Commander in the Red Shirt Movement of "76".



Croft, J. Gaillard
Captain
Company C

Quoted from Taylor as Captain.
Buried Christ Church.
Croft, Randell
Captain
Company C

Landowner in Charleson and Greenville County, First Captain and sponsor of Company C. A medical doctor, who rarely practiced.

“Died at his residence, near Greenville Village, on the second day of February, 1869, after a short and painful illness Dr. Randall Croft in the sixty-first year of his age."

"Dr. Randall Croft was born in Charleston his father, Edward Croft, Esq., a retired lawyer and wealthy low county planter, moved to Greenville, where he made a permanent settlement, his son Randall being a small boy. Greenville at that period and during the boyhood of Dr. Croft, was singularly fortunate in having a succession of learned, gifted, and apt instructors, at the head of the male academy and Randall being a bright boy, and fully availing himself of the advantages offered him, obtained a fine academic education and having been thus prepared he entered the junior class in the South Carolina College, where he graduated with credit for scholarship. On his graduation he read medicine under the instruction of Dr. Harrison, and subsequently obtained his diploma as Doctor of Medicine in the Medical College of Philadelphia. Dr. Croft married Miss Charlotte M. Jenkins of St. Helena, S.C. He never practiced medicine, having inherited a fortune, he had no pecuniary inducements to do so, owning a fine plantation and interests of St. Helena Island, a plantation in Newberry, and an amateur farm at this residence in Greenville, he found full employment for his active life; and his leisure hours were given to elegant hospitality, and his books, in both of which he was ardently attached."

"Although well qualified by his education and fine intellect to fill public appointments, he never sought them. He was however, elected to the Legislature of the State, by his friends in Greenville and served them with fidelity and ability."

"Dr. Croft, although keenly alive to the many iniquitous violations of the rights, and interest of the South, by Northern aggression, was nevertheless, always, in the best sense of that much abused term, a Union man and continued up to the commencement of the late war. But when our enemies in addition to the shameless violations of our political rights, determined also to enslave our people, to uproot their hearth stones, and take away their lives, the he was a Union man no longer; but like every true man of the south, he was ready to peril his all in defense of his native land. Then, notwithstanding his age and infirm health, he raised a volunteer company, of which he was elected Captain, and promptly took the field of active service against the horde of our Northern invaders and he continued in the service until it was evident that his age and increasing bodily infirmities rendered him unable to discharge the duties of his office. Then to the deep regret of himself and company, he resigned, and was succeeded in his office by his gallant son, Theodore G. Croft, Jr. who though a mere boy, being only seventeen years old, conducted his company through the War, with no less bravery than any son of South Carolina." The Southern Enterprise 3/3/69

Buried at Christ Church Episcopal, Randell Croft, M.D., Captain, C.S.A., 8/23/08, 02/03/69

Grave of
Croft, T.G
Captain
Company C

Son of Randell Croft named for Randell's brother Theodore Gaillard Croft. Captain until Consolidation with the 24th. Promoted to Major at that time and listed as Major at surrender in Greensboro.

Buried Christ Church Episcopal

See the rank of Major.
Furman University
Grave of



Foster, R.J.
Captain
Company D

The following is the obituary of R. J. Foster, who died on October 20, 1872, taken from the Carolina Spartan, October 21, 1872.

OBITUARY OF R. J. FOSTER

Died of congestive fever, October 20th, 1872, at his residence in Greenville County, Capt. Robt. J. Foster, in the fiftieth year of his age. Truly it may be said, that we have lost a good man, a worthy citizen, and a kind and generous friend, one amiable (?) of character elicited the universal respect of all who knew him.

Capt. Foster was born and reared near Spartanburg Courthouse, where he lived until about the year 1854 when he moved to Greenville County. At the commencement of the late war, he was elected to the Captaincy of the "Elford(?) Guards", Company D, 16th Regiment, S. C. V., and commanded that Company, during a part of the fierce struggle, so manfully waged for Southern Rights.

It may be said of him, that he was a true patriot, and above all, a tried veteran in the cause of Christ. He joined the Baptist Church at Bethlehem in his youth, and his Christian life was one of exemplary piety. To his bereaved family and numerous friends, what words could afford a more cheering solace ﷓ a more soothing balm in this, their hour of sad affliction, than those expressed by his: "I am not afraid to die." This is enough, nothing but the blessed religion of Christ can disarm death of its appalling terrors and "make a dying bed feel soft as downy pillows are."

END

Comments of the obituary from Brell Foster, Great-Great Grandson of Capt. R. J. Foster:

1. R. J. Foster was the son of James Foster and Patience Benson Foster of Spartanburg County, Roebuck community. R. J. Foster was married to Mary Ann Bowden Foster who was the daughter Reuben Bowden and Nancy Templeton Bowden.

2. R. J. Foster’s Grandfather was Robert Foster of Amelia, Virginia and Spartanburg County. Robert Foster was a Revolutionary War veteran.

3. It is assumed that the residence of Robert J. Foster was between Gowansville and Greer area of upper Greenville County. He was a member and is buried at Washington Baptist Church, North of Greer on Highway 14.

4. He grew up in the Roebuck Community, joined Bethlehem Baptist Church in Roebuck, where his parents are buried. In 1854 he sold his part of the family land and moved to upper Greenville County to an area we think was near his father-in-law’s, Reuben Bowden, land.

E-Mail Second Descendant



Captain Foster was involved in the sale of Dry Goods, in Gowansville at the beginning of the war.

E-Mail Second Descendant

Served until the 1862 reorganization.

Captain Foster is buried at Washington Baptist Church, where he served as a Deacon. He was the first burial in the cemetery. Located Highway 14, just north of Greer. Thanks, Brell.

Grave of

Captain C.M. Furman
Family

Furman, C.M.
Captain
Company H

Present at the Surrender

Buried Springwood Cemetery, Greenville, South Carolina, C.M. Furman, Lawyer, Educator, Asst. U.S. Atty., 1840-1934, C.S.A.
Staff Clemson University

Furman Letters
Furman University
His account of Franklin
Grave of

Charles M. Furman
Enlisted 1 May 1861 Charleston SC
2nd SCV
Mustered in May 22 1861
Enlisted Jan 23 1863 PBLA Co. A
Tranfsferred from Co. I, 2nd SCV.
On detailed duty as A. A. to Maj. Izard.
Elected Lt. 16th Regt. SCV 5th of Aug.
3rd Lt. Co. H-July & Aug 1863
Elected 2nd Lt. Aug 8 1863
Capt. Co.H--Nov, Dec 1863 CSR.
Promoted Dec 8 1863 Captain.



THE STATE
Columbia, S. C.
Tuesday Morning, September 13,1927

CAPT. W. A. GIBBES DIES AT RESIDENCE

Ill at Home on Two Notch Road Few Minutes

GALLANT SOLDIER

Funeral Services to Be Held at Trinity Church This Afternoon

Capt. Washington Allston Gibbes, ex-Confederate soldier, ex-railroad man, and the last of the 12 children of one of the most eminent physicians and scientists that South Carolina has produced, died suddenly at his home on the Two Notch Road near Columbia yesterday morning at 11:30 o’clock in his 86th year.

Mr. Gibbes was working in his yard until half an hour before his death. Upon coming into his home he lay down, complaining only slightly of tiredness from loss of sleep the night before and of some general pains. He was attended by his daughter, Miss “G” Gibbes. His condition not being alarming, she left the room for several minutes, during which time he passed away quietly.

Captain Gibbes was born in Columbia December 7, 1841, but lived in Augusta some 30 years, until 1911, when he returned to Columbia to become assistant to his brother-in-law, the late W. G. Childs, president of the Bank of Columbia and upon the latter’s death shortly thereafter Mr. Gibbes retired to a modest little home and garden, where he rounded out a green old age with the accompaniments of honor, love, obedience and troops of relatives and friends.

Mr. Gibbes is survived by his daughters, Miss Elizabeth Guignard Gibbes of Columbia; Mrs. H. C. Shover and Mrs. F. W. Plumb of Atlanta; and Mrs. J. T. Baillie of Augusta; and by his sister, Mrs. Harriet Hampton Dozier of Murrells Inlet.

The funeral services will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church at 4:30 o’clock this afternoon. Bishop K. G. Finlay officiating. Interment will be in Augusta, by the side of his wife, Wednesday morning. He was married March 21, 1869, to Miss Lizzie Hunt, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. S. P. Hunt, who refugeed to Augusta from Tennessee. Mrs. Gibbes died in Augusta in 1890.

The pallbearers will be: J. Wilson Gibbes, W. M. Gibbes, Frank H. Gibbes, C. Gadsden Guignard, O. Frank Hart and Walter C. Thomas.

Son of Doctor Gibbes

Mr. Gibbes was the seventh child of Dr. Robert Wilson Gibbes and his wife, Caroline Elizabeth Guignard. His father came to Columbia from Charleston to attend the South Carolina College, become assistant to Doctor Cooper, then a full professor, then with Doctor Nott he organized in Columbia a medical college that they conducted only a few years. Doctor Gibbes became famous as a journalist, publisher of The Carolianian; owner of the Saluda factory, practicing physician, collector of coins, fossil remains, art treasurers, etc. He was a well known author and was a friend of the scientist, Agassiz.
Gibbs, Wm. Alston
Captain
Company D


Captain Washington Allston Gibbs
Gregg Ballentine, Family

One of seven sons, of Robert W. Gibbs from Richland County, William Allston served the confederacy well. He was wounded 6/20/64 at Marietta, Georgia and present at the Surrender. Gibbes was a brave man from a fine family, but those very credentials made him a very unlikely choice for leadership in Company D, Sixteenth South Carolina. Company D was formed from the men of the dark corner. Those who remember their history know that Calhoun had first referred to the region under Glassy as the Dark Corner. Not a single vote was cast for nullification from the Glassy Mountain box; these were the most devout Unionist in South Carolina. As you can see, Gibbs was probably not the best choice, young and devoted to the Confederacy would probably not be impressive to the men of the corner.

For those who feel that the Union army did no burning in Columbia following the war the story of the Gibbs family is one that bears examination. Robert W. Gibbs was Surgeon General of the State of South Carolina. He was driven from his home, that home and the collections of a life time put to the torch and he was left a man with no hope. His letter to his son concerning the burning of the city and his losses is one of the most tragic notes of loss from a most tragic time. Gibbs the father, doctor, author, politician, and newspaperman died less than a year later. His home burned, his family wiped out and crippled, all in the name of self-government.

The following letter of Dr. Gibbs speaks of the death of "Bennie" who is Lt. Gibbs of the Sixteenth and the destruction of Columbia, it is addressed to Allston, Captain William Allston Gibbs.

Furnished through the kindness of Greg Ballentine, descendant.

Letter

Letter of
E-Mail Descendant

The Citadel and The Sixteenth

Obituary Continued from Column One

Captain Gibbes’ brothers, all prominent and distinguished Columbians were: Col. James G. Gibbes, Dr. Robert Wilson Gibbes, Maj. Wade Hampton Gibbes, Capt. William Moultrie Gibbes and Thomas Hasell Gibbes. Of his sisters, Mrs. John P. Thomas and Mrs. W. G. Childs of Columbia, and Mrs. Frank Dozier of Murrells Inlet, only the latter survives him.

Captain Gibbes was graduated at the Citadel in 1861; appointed drill master by Governor Pickens and assigned to the Sixteenth Regiment, S. C. V., enlisting as private in Company D; elected second lieutenant; fought under General Johnston at Jackson, Mississippi, and under Bragg at Chicamauga; promoted to first lieutenant and in 1864 advanced to captain; took part in battles of the Dalton-Atlanta campaign until severely wounded; upon recovery he was assigned by General Beauregard to duty with General Stevenson, division commander, as aide-de-camp; then on the staff of Lieut. Gen. D. H. Hill in North Carolina: made captain of Company C when the Sixteenth and Twenty-fourth South Carolina regiments were consolidated, acting as such at the time of the surrender.

Return to Columbia

After the war Captain Gibbes returned to Columbia where he was engaged in railroad construction and for three years was agent of the Greenville & Columbia railroad, then freight conductor on the Charlotte, Columbia & Augusta line. He was ticket agent at Augusta, 1879-1911, serving the railroad altogether for 46 years.

The private and public life of Mr. Gibbes was remarkable for its quiet success. Neither customers, friends, nor members of his family ever knew him to lose his temper or to speak ill of any person. That life was a rosary of good works. He kept the faith, he was given to hospitality, he owed no man and he loved all – thereby fulfilling every Biblical injunction. When he retired his every thought was centered upon contributing, out of his handiwork to the comfort of others.

Captain Gibbes was named after the celebrated painter, Washington Allston, his father’s friend, and but for the war Mr. Gibbes would have studied art. In the sunset of life his artistic sense showed itself in the making of quilts of wonderful design and many colors, not patchwork, but beautiful silk mosiacs in intricate designs, of which he produced 15, one for each of his children and grandchildren. This work he undertook to amuse and to occupy himself with.

It was laborious, but he illustrated his family motto, “tenax propositi,” tenacious of purpose.

Captain Gibbes’ entire life was a real mosaic of good deeds. He was a Mason in name and in reality. His life was not only numbered by years, but as Sheridan said, it was “treasured by a nobler line – by deeds.”

1841-1927



Goodlett, Benj. A.
Captain
Company K

Benjamin Alston Goodlett
The second child of Richard Goodlett and Anna Adams. He was born in 1827. In June of 1846 when the Saluda Volunteers mustered for the Mexican War, B.A Goodlett was with them.



(Taylor)

Gilreath, Perry D.
Captain
Company F

Resigned from the Sixteenth S.C.V in April of 63, Captain Gilreath joined the cavalry with the Army of Northern Virginia. He would ride with M.C. Butler and Hampton for the rest of the war. Capt. Gilreath would be elected Sheriff of Greenville County at redemption in 1876 on the Hampton ticket. He would serve in that office until 1900. Widely known and loved in the upper end, he was one of the few law enforcement officers who could come and go as he pleased in the mountains. He would outlaw public hanging and be viewed as both humane and fair. He had the greatest respect across all social and cultural lines. P.D. Gilreath was the high sheriff. For more information see the book, The High Sheriff.

Springwood Cemetery, Greenville

Grave of
Harrison, F.M.
Captain
Company D

Died of Illness at Brownsville, Mississippi, 12/15/63.



Captain George W. Holtzclaw, born 20 Sep 1840, was the son of Ethel Holtzclaw and Minerva Edwards, grandson of Stephen Holtzclaw and Ailsy Green. Stephen first settled in Greenville County in 1809 on Maple Creek (later known sometimes as Prince's Creek or Princess Creek) waters of Enoree. Captain George W. Holtzclaw married (1) Malinda Catherine Few and (2) Angeline Reece. He and Malinda Catherine were married 20 Dec 1860. Nine children are known: Lula born 14 Nov 1861 married Lawrence Blakely, Mary born 1863, William F. born 9 Mar 1866 married Lula Franks, Augustus B. born Sep 1869 married Corrie G., Ethel O. born 16 Aug 1874 married Hester M., John E. born 12 Feb 1877, Maud born 28 Sep 1878 married Rev. B. Murray Robertson, George E. born 8 Oct 1881 died in infancy, and Samuel E. born 12 Oct 1884. Malinda Catherine died 23 Mar 1888 and was buried in Brushy Creek Baptist Church Cemetery, Greenville County, SC. Capt. George W. Holtzclaw married Angeline Reece 1890. Angeline died 11 Jul 1910 and was buried at Brushy Creek as well. Capt. Holtzclaw died 5 Nov 1920 in Greer, SC. He was buried at Brushy Creek also. Captain Holtzclaw was present at the surrender in Greensboro and was wounded at the Battle of Nashville. He was also in attendance at the 1883 reunion.



(16th Museum)

Holtzclaw, George W.
Captain
Company F

Grave of

Letter of

Contributed by Suzanne Matson.
Thanks Suzanne!

E-Mail Descendant
Obituary from The Greenville News
Nov. 6, 1920

"Captain Holtzclaw dies at age of 80"
"Confederate Veteran of Greer Passes Away After Several Months Illness"
Greer, Nov 5. (Special)--Capt. George W. Holtzclaw, age 80, Confederate veteran, died at the home of his son, W. F. Holtzclaw, at 5 o'clock this afternoon after an illness of several months. Funeral services will be held Sunday morning at 11 o'clock from the Brushy Creek Baptist Church, interment following in the church cemetery. Capt. Holtzclaw, during his four years as a soldier in the civil war, was captain of Company "F" 16th South Carolina. Veterans of this company have been asked to act as honorary pallbearers at the funeral. Capt. Holtzclaw's first wife was Miss Catherine Few before her marriage; his second wife was Miss Angie Reese. She died some time ago. Capt. Holtzclaw is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Lawrence Blakely, of Simpsonville, and Mrs. B. M. Robinson, of Seneca; and by four sons, W. F., A. B., E. O., and John W. Holtzclaw." Note from Contributor: It should be Mrs. B. M. Robertson and John E. Holtzclaw." Capt. Holtzclaw began his service with Co. F of the 16th as a second lieutenant, later was promoted to first lieutenant and became Captain April 1863. Captain Holtzclaw was one of four sons of Ethel Holtzclaw who served in the Confederate Army. The others were Capt. Thomas A. Holtzclaw, Private J. Franklin Holtzclaw-killed 22 Jul 1864, Decatur, GA-burial place unknown-and John W. Holtzclaw.



Hodges, Davis W.
Captain
Company H

Resigned at the 1862 reorganization. Son of Colonel John Hodges, Davis W. was a well respected leader of the people of upper Greenville County.

Grave of

Buried at North Fork Baptist Church, Davis W. Hodges, 4-20-25, 1/4/10.


16th S.C.V. Museum

McJunkin, Charles Marion
Captain
Company A


Mention of
Born in Polk County Georgia
Moved to Greenville District, SC
Married to Barbara Ann Robison on 13 Oct. 1859
They had at least two children
Annie Almeda McJunkin (b. ca. 1867)
Charles McJunkin (b. ca. 1869).
Present at Reunion in 1883.
Died in Greenville County, SC.
Email Decendant

McCullough, J.L.
Captain
Company E

Son of Colonel. Served as Aide. Also served as Orderly Sergeant for Company E.

James Lewis McCullough, 2/25/40, 1/22/86, Buried at McCullough Family Cemetery, Highway 25, Princeton, S.C.
Furman University





McKittrick, Samuel
Captain
Company I

Letters of Extensive Group

Captain McKittrick was killed in action during the battles around Atlanta in July of 1864. A wonderful letter written shortly before his death survives and is shown in the letters section.

Buried at Fairview Presbyterian Cemetery, Samuel McKittrick, Born 7/23, who fell near Atlanta.

Grave of

McKittrick, Samuel, mentioned on pages 220, 230, 280, 368 - Brown, Russell K. - To the Manner Born, The Life of General Wm. H.T. Walker Cites McKittrick Letters which are located at Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield Park.


Monroe, A.J.
Captain
Company E

Andrew Jackson Monroe was born on June 10, 1824 in Laurens County, South Carolina. His father and mother were Robert Alexander Monroe and Elizabeth Austin, daughter of Samuel Austin. His brothers and sisters in order of birth were John, William Francis, Margaret (Ellison), and a younger sister, Adeline (Saxon). He married Nancy Ann Bagwell, daughter of John, on June 10, 1871. They gave birth to Robert A. Monroe (1871), John F. Monroe (1872), Margaret Adeline Monroe (1973), William Henry Monroe (1876), Andrew J. Monroe (1877), and Annie E. Monroe (1880).
(Thanks Jerry)

Captain Monroe brought several men to Greenville District from Laurens District to join the Sixteenth. He was promoted Major by some counts (Taylor), captured at Graysville in the retreat from Missionary Ridge, where the men fighting there distinguished themselves in the rear guard action. Captain Monroe was imprisoned at Johnson's Isle. He was from Laurens District. Captain Monroe is buried at Princeton Baptist Church. Thanks to Jerry Pressley and Jim Monroe

Grave of

E-Mail Descendant

Second Descendant

E-Mail Descendant

Betty Jo Parkins, Family

Parkins, C.A.
Captain
Company B

Charles Allen Parkins
Born 31 May 1831 in Greenville County, SC
Died 16 January 1910 in Greenville County, SC.
He married Mary Henrietta Sullivan 23 August 1866, daughter of Thomas Sullivan and Sara Cureton. She was born 11 July 1836 in Laurens County, SC, and died 30 December 1916 in Greenville County, SC.
Notes for Mary Henrietta Sullivan:
Called Hettie
Children of Charles Parkins and Mary Sullivan are: Sarah Rena Parkins, born 30 June 1867; died 12 October 1867. Paul Cureton Parkins, born 12 October 1868 in Greenville County, SC; died 02 August 1954.
Captured Graysville, 11/63, Johnson's Isle, present at reunion.

Buried at Springwood Cemetery, C.A. Parkins, Born 5/31/31, Died 1/16/10

Grave of

E-Mail Descendant



Roberts, Ed G.
Captain
Company I

Captain Roberts was present with the company at the surrender in Greensboro, N.C.

Furman University
Roberts, Thomas B.
Captain
Company A

Served until 1862 reorganization.

Buried at Springwood Cemetery, Thomas B. Roberts, Born 2/21/21, Died 9/3/85
Smith, Abraham T.
Captain
Company D

Died of Illness, Brownsville, Mississippi, 9/63



Smith, J.M.
Captain
Company E

Grave of

This is the grave of Private J.M. Smith, Company E, who was buried as a Captain at McGavock, correct rank is Private. Smith's only listing as a Captain is on the records at McGavock.



Andrew Thomas Wilson, Born 11/07/1821, the son of Emanuel and Delphia Wilson, grandson of Andrew Wilson Sr., who settled on George's Creek, Pickens County, S.C. around 1790. Andrew T. married around 1847. His wife was Martha Wynn, born August 30. 1828 and she died May 4, 1913. She was the daughter of Clemmons Wynn and Jane Benson. Andrew was the father of Elizabeth born 1849, Susan, born 1851, Thomas born 1853, John born 1856, Benjamin born 1859, Emma born 1867, Luther and Lura born 1869. Andrew was a farmer and land owner in Pickens County until 1883. He was a member of Cross Roads Baptist Church. In 1883, the family moved to Walhalla, in Oconee County and shortly thereafter three of his children moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee. He died on May 4, 1913 and is buried at Westview Cemetery, Walhalla, S.C. His Obituary appears in the Keowee Courier of February 22, 1905.


Photo provided by Judie Eaves
(Click for large image)

Wilson, Andrew T.
Captain
Company G

Provided by Judie Eaves
Thanks Judie!

Two of Andrew's brothers, John and Robert Wilson, enlisted along with Andrew. Robert is on the Company G roster. A strong family tradition says that Andrew was at Chickamauga. However, since he lost his command in 1862, he would have had to re-enlist.

Email descendant
Second Descendant
Email descendant


"Death of Capt. Andrew T. Wilson"
"Captain Andrew T. Wilson died suddenly at his home in Walhalla last Sunday morning about 9 o'clock. He was sitting in a chair by the fire, apparently no weaker than usual, when he fell forward and was dead when assistance reached him. He had been suffering for several months from dropsy, and his health had been gradually declining. Captain Wilson was in his 83rd year, having been born Nov. 7, 1821. He was a native of Pickens County, his birth place being in the George's Creek neighborhood. He was a Confederate soldier. Shortly after the outbreak of the War, he raised a company of volunteers at Marietta, in Greenville County, of which he was captain, and rendered excellent service in the cause of the Confederacy. His command was Company G, 16th S. C. Regiment, under Col. J. A. McCollough. He was a good citizen, honest and upright, and was respected by all. He leaves a wife and six children to mourn his death. His children are: A. J. Wilson, Jacksonville, Fla.; M. Wilson of Oconee; Mrs. Morgan and Mrs. Yates, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Mrs. Emma Pierce, Seneca; Miss Lura Wilson of Walhalla. His remains were buried at Westview Cemetery Monday afternoon, after funeral services at the residence, conducted by Rev. E. S. Jones."



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