A GALLERY OF PHOTOGRAPHS RELATING TO THE EIGHTY-SECOND ILLINOIS VOLUNTEER INFANTRY REGIMENT

A REGIMENT OF IMMIGRANTS

(Photo courtesy Massachusetts Commandery, MOLLUS, and the U.S. Army Military History Institute)

This photograph shows Eugene Weigel, regimental adjutant and later Captain of Company F. The photo was taken some years after the war -- compare it to the photo of Weigel in the group photograph on my homepage.

(Courtesy of Gregory Schuller)

Private Anton Buechle of Company E was a very young man when he enlisted in Peoria in August 1862. Tragically, he may well have been the last man in the 82nd to be killed in the Civil War -- he was shot by a Confederate sniper at Goldsboro, North Carolina on March 25, 1865, just three weeks before the end of the war.

Private John Ackerman of Company K of the 82nd Illinois. On the evening of July 2, 1863, the second day at Gettysburg, Ackerman's company had been sent back into the streets of the town at the base of Cemetery Hill to drive away Confederate snipers. Ackerman, known for his bravery, begged Captain Joseph Greenhut if he could wait behind because he had a strong presentiment of death. Greenhut relented, but while Ackerman was lying on Cemetery Hill awaiting the return of his company, he was killed by an exploding Rebel shell.

(Photo taken by author)

John Ackerman's grave in the National Cemetery at Gettysburg.

(Photo courtesy of John Martine)

The 82nd Illinois monument at Gettysburg. Located at the foot of Oak Hill near the site of the Eleventh Corps line, it marks where on the first day of battle the regiment served as infantry support for Captain Dilger's battery.

General William Sherman (left) led the Western armies through the Atlanta Campaign, the March to the Sea and the Carolina Campaign, all of which the 82nd Illinois took part in. General Alpheus Williams (right) was during this period commander of the First Division of the 20th Corps, within which the 82nd Illinois served.

This photo shows the 20th Corps marching down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington during the Review of the Union Army shortly after war's end in May 1865. The 82nd Illinois is somewhere toward the front of these men, being members of the lead (First) Division.


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