Nintendo Joysticks

Manufactured by: Quickshot

Quickshot Joystick -  Although it's pretty useless in most games, this joystick comes in handy when you need to tap the B button, like in Rad Racer, to tap the brake. It's solid and has a comfortable feel. The only  drawback, though, is that the cord is very short. Other than that, it's not that bad for a joystick, and it's even licensed. 

Manufactured by: Kraft

Starmaster - It's a pretty sorry piece of hardware, to say the least. First of all, the stick is so tight I can only manage to move it about a centimeter in every direction. Instead of a trigger, it has a button on the top of the stick. The B button is on the base along with the start and select buttons.

Manufactured by: Konix

Eypx 500XJ - I'm fairly certain this thing's unlicensed, seeing as how the plug is tight and not Nintendo-made. It's probably the oddest controller I've ever seen. The joystick on top is really noisy, and the A and B buttons are on the side. It also has the standard start and select buttons, along with a turbo fire. The only game I've been able to use this somewhat is Super Sprint, and even then it's not that good.

Manufactured by: Quickshot??  Nintendo??

Quickshot XII -  OK, it's a pretty standard joystick. Both A and B buttons, select, start, and an auto-fire which affects both buttons. The actual stick is pretty tight. At least the grip is solid. 

 

Manufactured by: Nintendo

NES Advantage (NES-026) - It just seems like a pain to use a clumsy joystick when you can just lay your thumb over a comforting crosspad of a regular controller. It's not feature-weak, though it's got a handy turbo feature, separate on both buttons and adjustable, and a corny slow feature. The slow just flashes the pause a million times a second (bad) and the turbo is OK. At least the big red buttons are easy to smack.

Manufactured by: Suncom

Mother Ship - At first glance this joystick seems normal, until you realize that it has no cord. Basically, the Mother Ship from Suncom is a cheesy joystick casing that you insert a normal controller into. There's a plastic door that has a hole for the cord and slips on the front. When you slam on the joystick buttons, it goes through and hits the buttons on the controller. You really have to hit the buttons hard, and this thing plays like shit! The stick barely moves. Once again, another crappy joystick!

Manufactured by: ??

Wing Commander - Unlike many sticks, it has buttons on both sides, so both left and right handed people can use it. You can also deactivate the diagonal direction on the stick, to make some games like Pac-Man easier to play with a stick (since the diagonal can mess up your game). I assume this was for the game Wing Commander originally?

Manufactured by: ??

Joystick-7 Mark II?? - This was released for the Famicom, and was probably only released in Japan. Probably also licensed, since it has the "Family Computer" logo on it. The guy who owns this said it had turbo fire (you can see a dial or slider towards the top), the auto-fire function is unknown (what are those switches for towards the bottom of the stick?)

Manufactured by: Quickshot

Aviator 2 - Now this is one bad ass controller! It is a (reasonably) accurate reproduction of a real flight yoke. It even has an altimeter of some sorts right on the front. Would be great for playing games such as Top Gun. Only drawback is that it does not have more variable rapid fire, and does not have auto fire. Otherwise, it is a real neat controller, one of Quickshot's better offerings.

Manufactured by: ??

Jammer - Well if you are at all associated with any pictures of Nintendo's Advantage controller, this should look VERY close to its appearance...a little TOO close to be considered a licensed product.  As you can see in the picture, the usual 360 arcade stick is there along with super sized B and A buttons. The start and select are on the top right and "dial-a-speed" is surely for the turbo buttons enhancing either the B or A controls, respectfully.

Manufactured by: ??

Bart Simpson Joystick - You can see the A and B buttons in front of the joystick, and start and select buttons in the back. If it has any features, I do not know what they are. The origins of this are also unknown, as is the official name. Definitely a collector's item, for Simpsons and NES fans alike, this is one of the more obscure controllers I have seen for the system.

Manufactured by: Honyu??  Champ??

Explorer I - Overall, the Explorer I joystick is a major NES Advantage rip off. The Explorer I has EVERY function the NES Advantage has, even the slow-mo. The cord plugs into both controller ports too. I am not certain if the Explorer I is pirated, it is unlicensed at least. After examining the joystick some more, I notice two mysterious buttons, one marked with a # and another with *. What do these buttons do? [More Pics]

Manufactured by: Beeshu

Beeshu Zinger - This guy has the A and B buttons both on the stick, as well as on the base; the select and start buttons are on the base with the two turbo fire on/off switches as well. There are four suction cups on the bottom of the stick as well, as there are on those similar Quickshot sticks. The stick itself moves okay, but the buttons are stiff and don't feel natural, and the product overall doesn't feel right. Still, it works, but I wouldn't use it for anything other than as a collector's item.

Manufactured by: Camerica

Turbo Tronic Joystick - This is the product that got Camerica broke... Nintendo had tried to sue them for a long time but couldn't do it before they made the mistake of manufacturing an almost exact copy of Nintendo's "NES Advantage". It looks a little bit weird, works OK but it's nothing that could have sold very well.

Manufactured by: Quickshot

Maverick 2 - The pad control only slightly differs from Nintendo's Advantage because of its molded groove, the turbo buttons (now "rapid fire" buttons), and the addition of new, hip colors.  It seems that Quickshot could not create a worthy name for this joystick, so they left it nameless. There's the basic ordinary Advantage features, but the smooth styling separates it from the rest. The Quickshot arcade stick feels very nice on the wrist. Suction cups add superb sticking ability for realistic arcade play. Overall, I would suggest picking this controller up.

Manufactured by: Nintendo

Flightgrip 2 - This is definitely one of the better NES products out there. It was designed for use with flying and driving games but offers a new challenge to all types of games.  The features (according to the box) include a space age design, compatible with the NES, 2 positive response buttons, high speed auto-fire capability, 8-direction thumb control pad, revolutionary new FlightGrip for maximum freedom, start/select switch, and 4-foot cable with 7-pin connector.  To sum it all up the Flightgrip 2 is a fun controller and nice collector's piece.

Manufactured by: Beeshu

Ultimate Superstick - This is another quality unlicensed product that comes from our friends at Beeshu. It comes equipped with all the standard features including rapid fire and slow motion settings. Two dials on the top-left of the joystick control the rapid fire.  The Superstick also attempts to accommodate left handed players (as seen in the Wing Commander joystick) by placing both A and B buttons on either side of the base. Suction cups on the bottom keep it from moving around.  All in all, the Superstick does not offer much to game-play but is certainly a nice collector's piece.

Manufactured by: QuickJoy

N-Pro - On the joypad there's a small "screen" which has never even been close to being a screen, but anyway, on this screen 6 small red led lights have been placed which will light up when you move the stick or press fire, of course this nasty feature can be switched off. What this stick really is about is AUTO-FIRE, there's even 3 different modes, it says fast and slow on the joypad so it's up to you to guess what the 3rd one is. On the stick itself this auto-fire crap can be turned off on a very small switch. The grip isn't well made at all, at least not for an adult hand, which I believe I've got, as it's over 18.  The only good thing is that the joystick works for both right and left (goofy?) handed people, that is IF that's a good thing, a good thing surely is that it sucks itself onto the table and refuses to let go. Also on the bottom side of the joypad is a small lid, leading to a small room inside the joystick, but this is for absolutely no use at all, just brilliant!

Manufactured by: Capcom

CPS Fighter - First of all, This joystick is compatible with both NES and SNES systems. There is a jack on the back where you can interchange the cords for each system.  There is a 4-8 way selector located just to the right of the joystick. This alters the way the joystick behaves. The 4 way acts like joysticks in Dig Dug and Pac Man arcade machines. It gives a very authentic arcade feel because when the stick is angled diagonally, it does not respond, just like in Pac Man and Dig Dug arcade machines. The 8 way gives you a Street Fighter style response. It allows for diagonals, and is recommended for playing Contra. To the upper right of each button is a light. It shows whether the button is pressed or not, and the level of turbo selected. To enable turbo, you must hold the desired button and press the level of turbo from the turbo buttons to the right. There are 3 different speeds. There is also a turbo off button.
 

Manufactured by: Beeshu

Zoomer - If you have any other info, please e-mail me.

Manufactured by: ??

Grip-It - If you have any other info, please e-mail me.

Manufactured by: ??

Ni-5 - If you have any other info, please e-mail me.

Manufactured by: ??

UFO Joystick - If you have any other info, please e-mail me.

Manufactured by: ??

If you have any info, please e-mail me.

Manufactured by: Spectravideo??

If you have any info, please e-mail me.
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