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Book Details:

Title:
Advice from the Lotus-Born:
A Collection of Padmasambhava's Advice to the Dakini Yeshe Tsogyal and Other Close Disciples

Authors: Padmasambhava, Yeshe Tsogyal

Publisher:
North Atlantic Books (December 1, 1996)
ISBN: 9627341207

 

 

Texts

Advice On How To Practice The Dharma Correctly


Source: Advice From The Lotus Born Guru (Shambala Press)
The Precious Guru breaks down misconceptions and falseness one by one: "Oral instruction doesn't mean many written books; it means a few words that strike the vital point of meaning in your mind."


PADMAKARA ~ THE MASTER OF UDDIYANA, resided at Samye after being invited to Tibet by the king. He gave numerous teachings to the king, his chieftains, and other devoted people in the eastern part of the central temple. Since they didn't understand correctly, he gave this advice repeatedly.

Master Padma said: No matter how much I teach, the people of Tibet don't understand; instead they engage in nothing other than perverted actions. If you want to practice the Dharma from the core of your heart, do like this:

To be a Buddhist lay person (upasaka) doesn't just mean to observe the four root precepts; it means to cast unvirtuous misdeeds far away. To be a novice (shramana) doesn't merely mean to assume a pure exterior; it means to practice virtue correctly. To be a monk (bhikshu) doesn't only mean to control body, speech, and mind in daily activities and to be forbidden to do all kinds of things; it means to bring all roots of virtue to the path of great enlightenment.

Oral instruction doesn't mean many written books; it means a few words that strike the vital point of meaning in your mind.

View doesn't simply mean philosophical opinion; it means to be free from the limitations of mental constructs.

Meditation doesn't mean to fixate on something with thought; it means your mind is stable in natural cognizance, free from fixation.

To be virtuous doesn't simply mean to wear yellow robes; it means to fear the ripening of karma. To be a spiritual friend doesn't just mean to assume a dignified demeanor; it means to be the glorious protector of everyone. To be a yogi doesn't merely mean to behave crudely; it means to mingle one's mind with the nature of dharmata.

To be a mantrika doesn't just mean to mutter incantations [with a malevolent attitude]; it means to swiftly attain enlightenment through the path of uniting means and knowledge. To be a meditator doesn't simply mean to live in a cave; it means to train oneself in the true meaning [of the natural state]. To be a hermit doesn't just mean to live in the deep forest; it means that one's mind is free from dualistic constructs.

To be learned doesn't only mean to uphold the eight worldly concerns; it means to distinguish between right and wrong. To be a bodhisattva doesn't mean to retain self-interest within; it means to exert oneself in the means of liberating all sentient beings from samsara.

To have faith doesn't mean to whimper; it means to enter the right path out of fear of death and rebirth. To be diligent doesn't mean to engage in various restless activities; it means to exert oneself in the means of leaving samsaric existence behind. To be generous doesn't merely mean to give with bias and partiality; it means to be profoundly free from attachment to anything whatsoever.

Oral instruction doesn't mean many written books; it means a few words that strike the vital point of meaning in your mind. View doesn't simply mean philosophical opinion; it means to be free from the limitations of mental constructs. Meditation doesn't mean to fixate on something with thought; it means your mind is stable in natural cognizance, free from fixation.

Spontaneous action doesn't just mean to act with crazy abandon; it means to be free from fixation on deluded perceptions as being real. Discriminating knowledge {prajna) doesn't mean the sharp intellect of mistaken thought; it means to understand that all phenomena are nonarising and devoid of mental constructs.

Learning doesn't just mean to receive teachings through one's ears; it means to cut through misconceptions and have realization beyond conceptual mind. Reflecting doesn't only mean to pursue conceptual thinking and form assumptions; it means to cut through your deluded clinging. Fruition doesn't only mean the rupakayas invited down from Akanishtha; it means to recognize the nature of mind and attain stability in that.

Don't mistake mere words to be the meaning of the teachings. Mingle the practice with your own being and attain liberation from samsara right now.

 
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