The Sound of Loading

Do you still have the Jupiter page I got from Scubidriver3 up? If not, press here.

You may have noticed that it takes a long time to load unless you have DSL or a cable modem. This is because this page has sound. Two lines of code produce this sound:

<bgsound src="wasureru.mid" loop=infinite>

The first one is really the only one you need for background music. However, the second one puts a little console up on the screen so you can change the volume or turn off the music:

<EMBED SRC="wasureru.mid" WIDTH=51 HEIGHT=15 controls=smallconsole autostart=true loop=true volume=75>

wasureru.mid is a midi file. There may be others your browser will play, but I don't know about them. I never put background music on my own pages because

  1. It can take a long time to load
  2. It can actually crash Internet Explorer on my machine
  3. I'm usually listening to something already, and I figure most users will also be doing that.

This is the code that FrontPage Express produced for my last bit of text:


<p><font face="Comic Sans MS"><strong>wasureru.mid</strong> is a
midi file. There may be others your browser will play, but I
don't know about them. I never put background music on my own
pages because </font></p>

<ol>
    <li><font face="Comic Sans MS">It can take a long time to
        load</font></li>
    <li><font face="Comic Sans MS">It can actually crash Internet
        Explorer on my machine</font></li>
    <li><font face="Comic Sans MS">I'm usually listening to
        something already, and I figure most users will also be
        doing that.</font></li>
</ol>

It sure wanted to be sure of the font, didn't it? Actually I'm going to use Arachnophilia's search-and-replace to take out all them and replace it with just one set. You can, incidentally, nest tags.

The Ordered List button from FrontPageWhat I made was an ordered list. I did this one by starting a new paragraph in Frontpage Express and pressing the button to the left. Until you press <Enter> twice in a row, each time you press <Enter> will start a new entry to the list and number it.

<ol></ol> contains an ordered list. Each new entry will have a number. <ul></ul> contains an unordered list; each item will begin with a bullet instead of a number. Each list item begins with <li>. They end with </li>, but you don't really need it. Incidentally, <li> will put up a bullet outside a list, at least in Internet Explorer; I've seen it used that way.

Getting back to looking at Scubidriver3's page, this may very well be where I discovered floating images and the <br clear=all> tag. What this does is break the text and not begin a new line until there are no pictures on either side. You can also fool with <br clear=right> and <br clear=left>, but I never have.

FrontPage and some other editors and page makers use <strong> instead of <b> and <em> instead of <i>. <b> for bold and <i> for italics. I recently discovered this is a Netscape extension, but Internet Explorer recognizes it and I think pretty much any other current browser will. On almost any editor, word processor, or page maker, <Ctrl>B will make text bold and <Ctrl>I will italicise it. But the folks who established the HTML standard went for <strong> and <em> (for "emphasis") instead.

Does any of this make a difference? It could; there is something called "Cascading Style Sheets" that can change the way <strong> and <em> are interpreted by the browser, but not <b> and <i> (supposedly.) For now, don't worry about it.

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