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Stone Knives and Bearskins
American Dream Stories Book 1 Book 2 Book 3 Book 4 Angel of Death Shades of Difference MTV Naru's Girl
My Links Fanfiction Links Authors in Archives Sailor Earths Other Links
Other Stuff About Japan Fan Art HTML Webrings Updates Main Index
Stone Knives and Bearskins Looking at HTML The Wonderful World of Color Fonts The Sound of Loading Pictures Using WS_FTP LE More Tags Tables Space

AS I SAID IN THE TABLE OF CONTENTS for this section, the title of this page is a joke from Star Trek: The Original Series. Chances are Joan Collins will be remembered longer for her part in that episode, called "The City on the Edge of Forever," in which she plays a Salvation Army lady! It's a time travel tale in which Kirk and Spock go back to New York during the Great Depression (the 1930s, in case you haven't had American History or slept through it.) Spock has to make a kludge for his tricorder using 1930s technology, which he points out is little better than "stone knives and bearskins."

Anyway, let's move on to the meat of the page: Where do you get all the stuff you are telling us how to use, Old Gringo? First of all, if you have Internet Explorer, you have FrontPage Express because it's the free pagemaker included in the package. It's also the default Editor. You should have it somewhere on your Start menu, and you can also get to it by pressing the "Edit" button on your toolbar, or by choosing "File" and then "Edit with Microsoft FrontPage Editor." Unless, of course, you have real FrontPage installed like the Marsh Angel and some other lucky few--but that one costs bucks.

Arachnophilia is freeware, or "CareWare" to quote the author, Paul Lutus, and is the program I usually turn on first when I start up my computer. It's a text-based editor but very much oriented to HTML. It's also powerful and easy to use, for a text-based editor. garouwyrm's cry for help in using it inspired me to start this section.

Another wonderful free text editor is NoteTab Lite. It's the free text editor my ISP recommmends, and I've been using it for quite awhile, but usually for bashing my .txt files to put my stories up at ASMR and other archives. It has many powerful features for HTML, though, and I've got to explore those someday.

About a month ago I got Irfanview, also recommended by Earthlink. This is a graphics viewer and converter, and I've found it's wonderfully useful. The feature I use all the time to make this tutorial is cropping. I do a screen capture using <Ctrl><Print Scrn> or <Alt><Print Scrn>, paste the clipboard into an Irfanview window, crop to the part I'm interested in, and save it as a GIF or JPEG file.

If you want some real detail about HTML close at hand, download the HTML Reference Library and install it. It's a Windows-style help file.

More Sites to Check Out

The SM Toolbox--Apatt's guide to making web pages is one of the first I discovered. The toolbox went away for awhile, and this new incarnation still has a lot of links to dead sites, I think, but it is still extremely useful. Quite a few of the links that will appear later in this section will have been gleaned from the Toolbox.

The Worst Sailormoon Pages Ever--The Amazon Quartet give "awards" to pathetic sites and also some good ones, and offer some good advice on how to make good web pages (though not the kind of nuts-and-bolts stuff you get here or at the The SM Toolbox.) A good way to learn how to do pages is to look at other people's; that's how I learned most of what I know, and the AQ will point out some good ones to look at in their "Best" section.

HTML Goodies--Learn something from Joe Burns, Ph.D. Joe writes in a very down-to-earth way with a minimum of jargon. Also stuff about Java, Perl, etc, if you want to take your webmastering skills to a new level.

Browsers.com--actually a section of the C-Net site. You can find the latest versions of the major browsers here, plus reviews, tips on using them, etc. Even if you use Internet Explorer or Netscape all the time, it's nice to look at your pages with the other guys' browser once in awhile--the results may surprise you, unpleasantly!

Nonags--A great site for freeware (and shareware, if you have money.) Unlike other places, freeware is seperated so you don't have to read a long spiel to discover the "free" goodie you are falling in love with ain't free. Items are all rated.

Dave's HTML Guide--A step-by-step HTML tutorial. It's more like a textbook than the approaches used by me, Apatt, or Joe Burns, but it's very good.

HTML HELP--I discovered Moshe Eshel's site a long time ago, so long I forgot where I got the stuff I downloaded. Happily Moshe is still around and still dispensing lots of accurate information!

The HTML Page at the W3C--That is, the World Wide Web Consortium, the people who set the standards.

American Dream Stories Book 1 Book 2 Book 3 Book 4 Angel of Death Shades of Difference MTV Naru's Girl
My Links Fanfiction Links Authors in Archives Sailor Earths Other Links
Other Stuff About Japan Fan Art HTML Webrings Updates Main Index
Stone Knives and Bearskins Looking at HTML The Wonderful World of Color Fonts The Sound of Loading Pictures Using WS_FTP LE More Tags Tables Space

Send comments to Thomas Sewell at oldgringo2001@yahoo.com.

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