100 Old Houses On The W&OD Trail


 More On Old Houses
  An Old House Gets A New Lease On Life
  Old Houses In Arlington
  Old Houses in Falls Church
  Old Houses In Fairfax
  Old Houses in Loudoun
  Sears Roebuck Houses
  Houses Open To The Public
  Annual Home Tours
  Home
  In The Civil War
  Biking
  The Railroad Remembered
  Parking
  Running
  What's New?
  Maps
  Walking
  In-Line Skating
  Old Towns On It
  Nature Centers and Museums
  Masonry Culverts and Trestles
  Railroad Photos
  Old Houses
  African- American Sites
  Equestrian
  Wildlife
  Bike Commuting
  Camping
  List of Photos Of It In Libraries
  Water Fountains
  Train Stations
  Railroad Suburbs
 Self-Guided Tours of Towns On Trail
  Falls Church
  Dunn Loring
  Vienna
  Herndon
  Sterling
  Ashburn
  Leesburg
  Waterford
  Hamilton
  Purcellville
  Round Hill
 Old Towns
  Falls Church
  Dunn Loring
  Vienna
  Reston
  Herndon
  Sterling
  Ashburn
  Leesburg
  Waterford
  Hamilton
  Purcellville
  Round Hill
"Something strange happens when a building ages past a human generation or two. Any building older than 100 years will be considered beautiful, no matter what. Having outlived its period of being out of fashion, plus several passing fashions after that, it is beyond fashion."

--Stewart Brand, How Buildings Learn

Arlington | Falls Church | Fairfax | Loudoun | Sears Houses (Built From Kit) | Annual House Tours | Houses Open To The Public | Recently Demolished | New Lease for an Old House

Step into the upside-down world of old houses, which has its own vocabulary. Do you know what a gable is? In this world, aluminum siding is bad, even though it requires little maintenance, while German siding
German siding exposed when porch was repaired on house. Located on crushed gravel parallel trail, near border between Loudoun and Fairfax, just west of Herndon. Part of Oak Grove, an African-American neighborhood, outside of the corporate limits of Herndon, centered around a Baptist church.  
is good, even though you must paint it every other year. Outside of Alexandria, old houses are scarce in Northern Virginia, because its population grew slowly until World War II. The houses along the railroad are one exception to this rule. People built houses near the railroad so they could commute to Washington, D.C. Prior to 1920, the roads were unimproved dirt, so driving into Washington was difficult. When fast growth arrived in both Arlington and Fairfax Counties, many old houses fell under the blades of bulldozers, further diminishing the supply. The story of old houses in Loudoun County is a happier one. Unless otherwise noted, all of these houses are private. Please respect the property rights of the owners by not trespassing on their land.

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This page last updated Apr 8, 2003 by

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