Product Details
Monopoly

Monopoly
From Hasbro

List Price: $18.99
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Product Description

Everybody remembers the Monopoly game - that's why it's still the most popular, most widely played, and best-selling board game in the world! Across the generations and around the globe, what other game brings back so many memories of wheeling-and-dealing family fun' No other game has turned so many game playing moments into memories! Whether you're discovering the fun for the first time or reliving the carefree days of youth, get out there and Buy! Sell! Mortgage! Build houses and hotels! And collect those rents! That's what makes Monopoly the great American game - just ask Rich Uncle Pennybags! For 2 to 8 players. Game includes: game board, 10 tokens, title deed cards, play money, chance cards, community chest cards, 32 houses, 12 hotels and two dice.


Product Details

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #106 in Toys & Games
  • Brand: Hasbro
  • Model: 00009 97
  • Format: CD
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 15.80" h x 10.60" w x 2.10" l, 2.25 pounds

Features

  • Classic family board game
  • A game of luck, chance, and wheeling and dealing
  • Buy and sell properties in Atlantic City
  • Corner parts of the board, build houses and hotels, and charge other players exorbitant rent
  • Includes a new game piece and rules for a shortened version of the game

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Review
In 1934, in the midst of the Great Depression, an unemployed heating engineer from Pennsylvania created the game of Monopoly. Realizing that his get-rich theme might appeal to other Americans, he had the game printed and distributed in a Philadelphia department store. When he couldn't keep up with the overwhelming requests for more sets, he arranged for Parker Brothers to take over the game. And the rest, as they say, is history. But Monopoly is far from a quaint historical relic. To this day, it remains a riveting game of luck, chance, and savvy wheeling and dealing--all of which can make some lucky dog rich, rich, rich! Based on the purchase of Atlantic City real estate (a city currently renowned for its get-rich gambling opportunities), Monopoly is now printed in 26 languages with more than 200 million sets sold worldwide. Players still scoot the same beloved board pieces: the old shoe, the terrier, and the hot rod. This set also includes rules for a shortened version of the game and a new token, winner of Monopoly's recent "design a token" contest. This is capitalism at its most fun and ruthless, a must-have edition in the family game closet. --Gail Hudson

From the Manufacturer
In 1934, in the midst of the Great Depression, an unemployed heating engineer from Pennsylvania created the game of Monopoly. Realizing that his get-rich theme might appeal to other Americans, he had the game printed and distributed in a Philadelphia department store. When he couldn't keep up with the overwhelming requests for more sets, he arranged for Parker Brothers to take over the game. And the rest, as they say, is history. But Monopoly is far from a quaint historical relic. To this day, it remains a riveting game of luck, chance, and savvy wheeling and dealing--all of which can make some lucky dog rich, rich, rich! Based on the purchase of Atlantic City real estate (a city currently renowned for its get-rich gambling opportunities), Monopoly is now printed in 26 languages with more than 200 million sets sold worldwide. Players still scoot the same beloved board pieces: the old shoe, the terrier, and the hot rod. This set also includes rules for a shortened version of the game and a new token, winner of Monopoly's recent "design a token" contest. This is capitalism at its most fun and ruthless, a must-have edition in the family game closet.


Customer Reviews

If you are annoyed by small "updates," this is not the set for you2
This Monopoly set was cheaply produced in China, as you might guess given its price. For a family looking for a first set, it seems satisfactory. But anyone who has played Monopoly for years should be on notice that this set, redesigned in 2008, includes several minor annoyances.

First, the most practical annoyance. The board folds up into quarters, which allows the manufacturer to fit the set into a smaller box, presumably to reduce production costs. But because the box is somewhat smaller (about 16 inches long), there is no room for the sort of convenient tray for Monopoly money that was once standard in the old boxes (which were about 20 inches long). This is annoying for both gameplay and storage.

Second, the producers have unnecessarily and inexplicably made small changes to the rules of the game -- rules that have stood for more than half a century. Landing on the Luxury Tax space used to cost you $75; now it costs $100. The new rules also change the numbers of each kind of bill to be apportioned to players at the start of the game -- and in fact, the game comes with a smaller supply of some bills.

Mention of this set's Monopoly money brings us to the third annoyance: the manufacturers made numerous gratuitous changes to the look of the game. The palette of colors used for Monopoly bills in the United States since the 1940s has been changed: The $10 bill used to be yellow; now it's blue. The $50 bill used to be blue; now it's purple. (These changes make it hard to reuse money from older Monopoly sets.) Among the other unnecessary changes to the look of the game: The formerly purple properties on the board (Mediterranean Avenue and Baltic Avenue) have been recolored brown. The Community Chest and Chance cards are now printed on white cardstock instead of the familiar orange and yellow, and the classic drawings on those cards have been replaced with computer-generated 3D cartoons. Even the "Go" space has been redesigned: now the word "Go" is written in black instead of the familiar red. (Stodgy purists might also be put off by the various alterations to font, logo, and other design elements.)

To be sure, these changes do not alter the fundamentals of the game itself. But they are annoying enough that anyone with nostalgic memories of the game from childhood should consider a different set.

Still a great game5
Monopoly is often overlooked as a gamenight option these days, many people considering it outdated. But it's a classic for a reason, combining lucky rolls and strategy in a very unique way.

The fact is that most people don't play Monopoly by the correct rules, and that makes all the difference. The key to enjoying the game is the inter-player deals and politics. That's where all the fun lies, and much of the strategy. Any player can strike any kind of a deal with another player - want to trade all the purples and light blues for Boardwalk? No problem. Want to trick someone into trading a property you need for all your railroads? This is where the real enjoyment comes from. I encourage you not only to get the game and play it, but to read the rules and "get into" the game.

There are also some fun alternate rules you can use, such as collecting $400 (instead of $200) when you *land* directly on "go", or putting fine money (from chance cards, utility expenses, get out of jail money, etc.) in the center of the board and collecting it when you land on "free parking".

Don't overlook Monopoly as an outdated option. It's still one of the best games out there.

The most classic board game of all time5
There's no doubt that Monopoly is the most popular and best known board game ever made. Everything about it is a true classic. Everything from just choosing what your character will be out of metal characters such as a cruise ship, a wheel barrow, a car, etc. to buying property and placing hotels on it in order to drain money from your opponents, is as classic as it gets.

Monopoly is definitely a game that anybody no matter how old they are can enjoy. It involves strategy, and even some luck, and it's a lot of fun. The only downfall is that sometimes it can take a long time to play a full game of Monopoly and that some people, especially kids, might get bored with it and want to quit. I recommend anybody who likes playing board games to get Monopoly more than any other board game ever made.


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