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Early  HOME  MOVIE  photography
   
SHORT  HISTORY
The first "real" movie cameras (and projectors) arrived in the late 1890's.
It evolved after a long period of inventions like the Magic Lanterns and projectors creating the illusions of movement from mechanical moving slides, flip books etc...

The movie camera of those days looked like the wooden-box cameras but with a hand crank for rolling the film.
The early popular film was 35mm and later the half width (17.5mm).
Also, there were all kinds of film-sizes like: 15,13,22 ,28 and the 9.5mm.

 In the 1920's the 16mm film was introduced, KODAK joined the 'club' with it's KODAK CINE line of movie cameras thus making the 16mm film very popular in America while the 9.5mm film (Pathe) ruled in Europe.

From 1920's on, amateur/home movie photography became very popular! Toys like/projectors as the KEYSTONE (Moviegraph) with B/W short-silent-movies and other more expensive home cameras &projectors were popular.

In 1932 Kodak introduced the Cine Eight-20 camera for it's NEW  8mm film! and many companies joined in to develop movie cameras for the new 8mm film to become the ruler in home filming. The last step was in 1965 - the Super-8 film was born! allowing the film to contain  sound track (in the 1970's) but then the VIDEO CAMERA was born and changed the home-films into home-videos....
 

MOVIE CAMERAS / PROJECTORS
Click on the pictures for more info. on each

FROM SLIDES TO MOVIES:



top to bottom:
 - Early slide:wood frame+glass 
 - Victorian:hand painted glass slide (1800's)
 - EP magic lantern glass-slide (1920?)
 - early 35mm film: moving drawings 
film's size:
Super 8
8mm (regular)
9.5mm
16mm
35mm
 Click on the picture for more details Click on the picture for more details
Heavy duty  MAGIC LANTERNs / slides projectors
illuminated by GAS  (Click on the pic. for more details)

 Click on the picture for more details
Typical tin (Toy) MAGIC LANTERNs of the 1900's
illuminated by an oil lamp    (Click on the pic. for more details)

 Click on the picture for more details
KEYSTONE MOVIEGRAPH Projector, USA, 1920's(35MM)

 Click on the picture for more details  
PATHE  home projector,  FRANCE,  1920s  (9.5MM)
the ROOSTER logo of the PATHE company

 click on the pic for more details
PATHEORAMA  35mm film viewer (toy?),  FRANCE,  1920s
* click on the pic for more details on the Patheorama

 
PATHE baby movie cameras,  FRANCE, 1920s (9.5MM)
1923-25 : Hand-crank - one rotation = 8 frames    on the left
1926-27 : spring motor (double sized and heavy!)  on the right

 Click on the picture for more details
CINE KODAK Model K, USA, 1930-1946 (16MM)

 Click on the picture for more details
UNIVEX A8, UNIVERSAL, USA, 1936 (8MM)

 Click on the picture for more details
KEYSTONE  K-8,  USA, 1930's -40's(8MM)

 Click on the picture for more details
FILMO COMPANION, BELL & HOWELL, USA, 1941(Double-8MM)

 Click on the picture to see more details
EKRAN 3, RUSSIA, 1960'S(8mm)

 
ELMO  GP DUAL 8  PROJECTOR (I used it in the 1970s)
For 8 or super-8 films (syncronization of the film with a tape recorder)

From the COLLECTOR's POINT OF VIEW
Movie camera collection is starting to gain popularity - with the difficulties of: SPACE & WEIGHT (Those cameras & projectors are BIG and HEAVY)
The good news: the price of most of the movie cameras are relative low (meanwhile...)

REFERENCES
* A good reference book is the "History of Movie Photography" by Brian Coe
   Jump to the BOOKS page




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