Moshe BAR-EL 
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MISCELLANEOUS
EXPOSURE METERs

Left to Right:  ZEISS ,WYNNE's Infallible and WATKIN's BEE meter

The meters are in the form of a pocket watch & a discs of sensetive paper (exposed/used).
The meter contains a disc of sensetive paper which by turning the "watch" exposes a segment (see pic.) of fresh paper, the time it goes into dark is the base to calculate the right exposure "for your plates"... The back of the "watch" when opened contains spare discs of paper.


VISUAL  EXTINCTION METER,  GERMANY,  1920-30s

The meter was held to the eye:
Inside a set of letters (A to Z) could be seen according to the existing source of light and the

EARLY SELF TIMERs

Haka Autoknips and other Mechanical timers that were used  before the era of a built-in self-timer in the cameras.
INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Connect a shutter cable-release to the timer.
2. trigger the timer
3. release the lock so the timer will starts running....
4. run in front of the camera with a BIG SMILE!  (look at the red circle when it stops down-the pic. was shot)

The AUTOGRAPHIC feature, from 1914

STYLUS & DOOR (on the back of the VP-KODAK camera)

The autographic feature was introduced by KODAK in 1914. And many cameras in that era came with it. The 'autographic' added to the camera's name.
INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Load the camera with an autographic-film. (a special film with a tissue between the film and the paper).
2. Open the door - located at the back of the camera.
3. write with the special stylus your date or description.
4. Close the door.
5. Take the picture.
In the 30's when the films became too sensetive to light the feature 'died' to come back later at a completely new form as the DATE in the modern camera.


The RED WINDOW
  ( the red circular window as seen in the previous pic.)
The red window on the back of the camera was a simple yet efficient way to know the location of the film and what picture is it now.
The patent invented in the 1890's and bought by EASTAMN for the Kodak line of cameras.
The filmwhite numbers printed on a special black paper behind the celuloid-film. The paper was longer than the film to protect it from the light when loaded/unloaded.
The window:  Located on the back of the camera. through it the white numbers could be seen.

The red window died when the films got more sensitive to the light and mechanical and later electronic counters where used.

How to restore a red-window: if it's missing or broken- use an exposed or used film and you get the same effect.


WATER COLORS for B/W PICTURES
Until the color processing became the standart: studios offered the coloring of the B/W photos with delicate transparent water colors thus addind life and beauty to the pictures (if done well...).
KODAK offered a DO IT YOURSELF outfit:
  
Color your own prints and enlargement with
VELOX TRANSPARENT WATER COLOR STAMP OUTFIT
No experience necessary

The Outfit consists of an Artist's Mixing Palette, three special Hair Brushes and a book of Velox Transparent Water Color Stamps (12 colors).
Price .......................................   0.85$
September - 1911
MADE by EASTMAN KODAK Co.   (1910-1940?)

OTHER COLORING SET


NON CAMERAs:
 CIGARETTE  LIGHTER,   JAPAN ,  1950s

I collect only cameras and photographica BUT I couldn't resist that cute lighter: Just press  the shutter-release-cord and the flame burns up!


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