AUFTRAGSTAKTIK
Miniatures Rules

  Mike J.
The J-8 Shop

ISRAELI DEFENSE FORCE, 1970s

Introduction
The Israeli Defense Force has been one of the most outstanding practictioners of maneuver warfare in the 20th Century. Faced with a coalition of hostile Arab states with their Soviet patron constantly willing to replenish, free of charge, their arsenals with some of the best equipment the Soviet defense industry could produce, outnumbering or outgunning its likely foes was never a feasible course of action for the IDF. During the first two decades of its existence Israel received very little military assistance from the United States. The bulk of its weaponry during these decades came from France (fighter aircraft, most notably the famous Mirage IIIC that won it air superiority in 1967, light tanks, fast attack craft), Great Britain (Centurion tanks), and Germany (fast attack craft, the initial shipments of M48 tanks). Large-scale shipments of US military equipment commenced only after the Six-Day War. Therefore the tactics the IDF used in its initial wars emphasized dash, surprise, and maneuver, with the intent of effecting a preemption or dislocation of the larger, often more heavily equipped, but also less agile opposing forces. These tactics worked very well in 1956 and 1967. In 1973, however, the careful preparations of the Egyptian and Syrian forces, combined with a highly successful battlefield deception campaign, meant than in 1973 it was the Egyptians and the Syrians who caught the Israelis off guard and as a result inflicted heavy losses on Israel forces and came close to achieving an overall victory.

The Yom Kippur Wwar also revealed significant flaws within the IDF. By 1973, the most damaging was the "victory disease" that set in after the swift victory in the "Six-Day War" of 1967. The rapidity and decisiveness of the victory led the IDF into a near-fatal error of underestimating one's foes. Moreover, the spectacular performance of its armored formations caused the Israelis to discount the importance of infantry. This pro-armor bias was reinforced by the demographic attractiveness of tank forces, as a tank battalion required considerably fewer soldiers than an infantry battalion. When the war broke out in 1973 some mechanized infantry brigades were even in process of being converted into armor units. As a result Israeli mechanized infantry units were neglected regarding both equipment and training, and in 1973 their performance did not match that of the rest of the army. Worse, Israeli armor formations took heavy losses in the opening stages of the war on the Sinai when attempting to assault Egyptian infantry, by now well schooled in tank-fighting and amply provided with AT weapons, without own infantry or artillery support. The situation was rescued by the existence of an excellent paratroop force, whose brigades were pressed into armor support role once the war broke out. That the IDF prevailed in its toughest battlefield test ever was a reflection of the high quality of its officers and soldiers who were able to rebound from the initial defeats, devise new tactics, and eventually prevail.

Doctrine and Troop Quality
Veteran, Decentralized Doctrine, High Morale, except:
Mechanized Infantry Battalions: Balanced Doctrine, some units Regular
Parachute and elite Infantry (Golani) Brigades: Very High Morale, some units Elite
HQ Command Radius 12 (Battalion and Regiment); 24 (Division)
HQ Rating: 5

Cross-attachments:
Battalions may exchange companies. Companies within a battalion may exchange platoons, or platoon(s) from one company in a battalion may be attached to other company(s) in the same battalion. Brigades may exchange or transfer battalions.

Unit Organization

Size codes: s=small, m=medium, l=large; p=platoon, c=company, b=battery

Battalions:

Tank Battalion:
4 Tank Companies (sc)

Mechanized Infantry Battalion: 
3 Infantry Companies (mc), 3 APC Companies (mc),
1 SP 81mm Mortar Battery  (mb), 1 Jeep w/106mm RCL Platoon (mp)

Parachute Battalion: 4 Parachute Infantry Companies (mc), 4 APC Companies or Truck Companies (mc), 1 81mm Mortar Battery (towed) (mb),
1 Jeep w/106mm RCL Platoon (mp)

Infantry Battalion: 3 Infantry Companies (mc), 3 APC Companies or Truck Companies (mc), 1 81mm Mortar Battery (towed) (mb), 1 Jeep w/106mm RCL Platoon (mp)

Artillery Battalion: 3 Batteries (mb)


Brigades:

Armored Brigade: 2 Tank Battalions, 1 Mechanized Infantry Battalion, 1 SP 155mm Howitzer Battalion, 1 Reconnaissance Company [2 Tank Platoons (mp), 1 Recon Infantry Platoon (mp), 1 APC Platoon (mp)], 1 Anti-Aircraft Company [3 T-20 Platoons (mp)]

Mechanized Brigade: 1 Tank Battalion, 2 Mechanized Infatnry Battalions, 1 SP 155mm Howitzer Battalion, 1 Anti-Aircraft Company
[3 T-20 Platoons (mp)], 1 Recon Company [4 Recon Jeep Platoons (mp), 1 Jeep/106mm RCL Platoon (mp)]

Parachute Brigade: 3 Parachute Battalions, 1 Artillery Battalion with either SP 120mm Mortars or 155mm SP Howitzers, 1 Recon Company
[4 Recon Jeep Platoons (mp), 1 Jeep/106mm RCL Platoon (mp)], 1 Anti-Aircraft Company [3 T-20 Platoons (mp)]

Infantry Brigade: as Parachute Brigade


Divisions:
Israeli divisions did not follow a standard organizational structure, and had a mix of armored, mechanized, parachute, and infantry brigades. Examples are Ariel Sharon's 143rd Division, with 3 Armored and 1 Parachute Brigade, and Albert Mandler's 252nd Division with 4 Armored Brigades. In addition, each division had up to 3 SP 155mm Artillery Battalions, and a reconnaissance battalion.

Divisional Recon Battalion: 1 Tank Company (sc), 1 Jeep Company [4 Recon Jeep Platoons (mp), 1 Jeep/106mm RCL Platoon (mp)], 1 APC Company (sc), 1 Recon Infantry Company (sc)

Unit Data

HQ

Brigade or Division HQ.
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
8t
1
CC: 2
HW: 2 [6]
SA: 2
CC: 3
--



Main Battle Tanks


 Centurion Tank Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc or sc
6t
9
G (g/b): 8

HE (g/b): M
HW: 2 [6]
--



 M60A1 Tank Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc or sc
6t
8
G (g/b): 8

HE (g/b): M
HW: 2 [6]
--


 M48 Tank Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc or sc
6t
7
G (g/b): 8

HE (g/b): M
HW: 2 [6]
--


 Isherman Tank Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc or sc
6t
5
G (g/b): 6

HE (g/b): M
HW: 2 [6]
--


IFVs and APCs

M113 APC Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
8t
1
--
HW: 2 [6]
--
Transports infantry up to own size.

 M3 Halftrack APC Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
6t
1o
--

HW: 2 [6] --
Infantry transport up to own size.

Infantry

Mechanized Infantry Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
2f
0
CC: 2
M (g): 10* [4]
SA: 2
HW: 2 [4]
CC: 3
--
 

 Parachute or Infantry Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
2f
0
CC: 4
M (g): 10* [4]
SA: 2
HW: 2 [4]
CC: 3
--


Reconnaissance and Anti-Tank Stands

Recon Jeep Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sp
8w
0
--

HW: 2 [4]
--
II

Jeep/106mm RCL Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mp
8w
0
G (b/b): 9*

HE (b/b): L
--
II

Artilllery

M109 155mm SP Howitzer Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb
6t
1
G (b/b): 10*

HE (b): H
HW: 2 [4]
HE: H [36]


L-33 155mm SP Howitzer Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb
6t
1o
G (b/b): 10*

HE (b): H
HW: 2 [4]
HE: H [40]


M-46, M114, or M68 155mm Towed Howitzer Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb
8lw
0/-2
G (g/b): 10*

HE (b): H

HE: H [40]

BM-24 Rocket Launcher Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb
8lw
-2
--

--

HE: H [60] (-1)


81mm Mortar Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb
8w
0 (when deployed); -2 (when moving)
--
--
HE: L [8]
--


Air Defense


 T-20 Halftrack Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sp
8t
1o
G (b/b): 1

HW: 3 [6]

-- AA Gun (b/b): 3 [6]

Aircraft

 F-4 Phantom Fighter-Bomber Flight
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mp
A
1/1
G: 2

HW: 4
HE: VH (+1)


 A-4 Skyhawk Flight
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mp
A
0/1
G: 2

HW: 4
HE: VH (-1)



Mike J.
=
====
The J-8 Shop
Wargame Rules, Variants, and Orders of Battle
http://www.geocities.com/pmj6/




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