Auftragstaktik
Miniatures Rules

Mike J.
J-8 Shop


Armee de Terre: French Ground Forces
1990s
The collapse of Soviet Union, and the precipitous decline of the Russian armed forces led to considerable changes in France's defense posture. One of the key developments has been the adoption of an all-volunteer system of recruitment, an unprecedented development in the history of post-Revolution France. The elimination of the draft is part of the reorientation of the French defense priorities away from the defense of French territory and toward "out of area" force projection. In process, the French army is becomng a far more homogeneous force than it has ever been. The sheer variety of security commitments, and the limits on French resources, have long meant, for all intents and purposes, the existence of not a single cohesive military but rather three separate forces: the all-volunteer component for overseas deployments (largely consisting of the Troupes Coloniales/Troupes the Marine, the Foreign Legion, and some Parachute formations), the heavy conventional maneuver forces intended for European conflict and relying on draftees, and finally the reserves. In the past, these three separate bodies have displayed widely varying standards of training and readiness, and these disparities have proved to be a major flaw in the French military organization. The weakness of reserve formations nearly proved a fatal weakness in 1914, and did prove one in 1940. Although during the Cold War era the French leadership opted to rely on nuclear weapons rather than a massive conventional force for its security, these divisions persisted and were to some extent exacerbated by the high price tag of France's near-indigenous nuclear arsenal (in contrast to Great Britain, which buys ballistic missiles from the United States, French nuclear warheads sit atop French missiles). The difficulties in keeping the heavy conventional forces properly equipped in the 1970s and the 1980s are detailed below.

The reduced in size military manned entirely by volunteers is unlikely to suffer from these defects. Its 8 maneuver brigades (in addition to a large number of separate maneuver regiments and support brigades) are likely within France's abilities to maintain at high level of readiness and equipment. In addition, since the French Constitution places severe restrictions on the government's ability to send draftees to fight in overseas conflicts, the creation of an all-volunteer force means virtually every unit in the French Army is now eligible for overseas deployment. Whereas the French force that participated in the Operation Desert Storm was cobbled together out of the all-volunteer elements of the French Army, an effective though clumsy and imperfect solution, the increasing professionalization of the French military will make future such deployments much easier, particularly ones involving heavy forces which prior to the 1990s were largely manned by draftees (the one AMX-30B2-equipped battalion that took part in ODS had to be specially assembled for the mission).. The ability to send heavy forces overseas was exercised in May 2002 (deployment of the 2eme Brigade Blindee to Ukraine) and November 2002 (a smaller deployment to Qatar), exercises that appear to have been rehearsals for the projected French military participation in the anti-Iraq coalition. Although a number of French ground and air units were alerted for such a mission in early 2003, subsequent political developments have precluded French military participation in the Operation Iraqi Freedom. However, a French contingent consisting of Marine, Parachute, and mountain infantry units, as well as special operations troops of the COS and a Mirage-2000D squadron based in Turkmenistan, has been active in Afghanistan since 2002. French forces have also remained active in peacekeeping operations in the Balkans and a number of civil wars in Africa, most notably in the Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone. French units have also been deployed to Chad to protect the refugee camps against attacks by the Sudanese military and militias. In the event of a UN-authorized military action against Sudan, French forces would likely see action on that front.

Organizationally, the Armee de Terre has de facto discarded a permanent division-based organization (one might argue that the small armored divisions of the 1980s were in fact only large brigades) and downsized to a force of 8 maneuver brigades (2 armored, 2 mechanized, 2 light armored, 1 airborne, 1 mountain), in addition to a variety of separate maneuver and support regiments.
However, the brigades themselves are not permanently constituted, and a deploying brigade is likely to have a mix of regiments different from its peacetime establishment. The order of battle also includes one airmobile brigade (1 reconnaissance, 2 combat, and 1 transport helicopter regiments) and 1 artillery support brigade (2 MLRS regiments, 3 SAM regiments with Aster-15/30, Roland, and Mistral missiles). The French military leadership estimates that it could deploy up to 3 full brigades simultaneously (division-level headquarters exist to coordinate multi-brigade deployments) without disrupting the military's trainign cycle. Leclerc MBT procurement complete, a variety of additional new weapon systems appears to be in the pipeline, including the VBCI infantry fighting vehicle to replace the AMX-10P and some VABs, the EBRC reconnaissance vehicle, Tigre/Gerfaut attack helicopters, and the FELIN suite of equipment for infantry soldiers.

Doctrine and Troop Quality
Veteran, High Morale
Marine, Parachute, Mountain, Foreign Legion units: Veteran or Elite, Very High Morale
Force d'Action Rapide: Veteran or Elite, Very High Morale
Doctrine: Decentralized
HQ Rating: 6 (7 for elite units)
HQ Command Radius: 12 (Regiment), 12 (Brigade), 24 (Division)

Cross-attachments:
Battalions may exchange companies. Companies within a battalion may exchange platoons, or platoon(s) from one company in a battalion may be attached to other company(s) in the same battalion. Brigades may exchange or transfer battalions.


Unit Organization

Regiments

Tank Regiment (RC80): 2 Groupes d'Escadrons [each with 3 Tank Squadrons (AMX-30) (lc), 3 VAB T-20 Platoons (sp). 3 VBL Recon Platoons (sp)], 1 Reconnaissance Company [3 VBL Recon Platoons]

Mechanized Infantry Regiment (early 1980s): 4 Mechanized Infantry Companies (mc), 4 IFV Companies (lc), 1 120mm Mortar Battery (mb) [VAB-towed], 1 Reconnaissance Company
[2 VBL Recon Platoons (sp), 1 VBL Milan Platoon (sp)]

Motorized Infantry Regiment (VAB): 4 VAB Companies (lc), 4 Infantry Companies (mc), 1 120mm Mortar Battery (mb) [VAB-towed], 2 81mm Mortar Batteries (sb) [VAB-mounted], 2 Milan Platoons (mp)[each with a VAB Platoon (sp)], 2 20mm AA gun Platoons (mp) [VAB-towed],
1 Reconnaissance Company [2 VBL Recon Platoons (sp), 1 VBL Milan Platoon (sp)]

Light Armored Regiment: 3-4 Armored Car Squadrons (mc), 9 VBL Recon Platoons (sp), 6 VBL Milan Platoons (sp),  (mp) [AMX-10RC-equipped regiments have 4 squadrons, ERC-90 regiments have only 3]

Parachute, Marine, or Mountain Regiment: Organized as a Motorized Infantry Regiment


Artillery Regiment: 4 Batteries (lb)

Multiple Rocket Launcher Regiment: 3 Batteries (lb)

Roland/Mistral SAM Regiment: 2 Roland Batteries [3 SP Roland Platoons (mp)], 2 Mistral Batteries [4 SP Mistral Platoons (mp]. Rolands to be replaced by truck-mounted Mica.

Combat Helicopter Regiment: 4 Attack Helicopter Flights, (sc), 1 Transport Helicopter Flight (mc)

Transport Helicopter Regiment: 4 Transport Helicopter Flights  (mc), 1 Attack Helicopter Flight (sc)

Brigade Reconnaissance Squadron: 6 Recon VBL Platoons (sp), 2 Milan VBL Platoons (sp)

Brigade Anti-Tank Company: 4 VCAC Mephisto Platoons (mp)

Brigades

Armored Brigade: 1 Tank Regiment, 2 Mechanized Infantry Regiments, 1 SP 155mm regiment, .1 Brigade Recon Company, 1 Brigade AT Company

Mechanized Brigade: 1 Leclerc Regiment, 1 AMX-10P regiment, 1 SP 155mm regiment.
.1 Brigade Recon Company, 1 Brigade AT Company

Light Armored Brigade: 2 AMX-10RC Light Armored Regiments, 2 VAB regiments, 1 towed or SP 155mm regiment, 1 Brigade Recon Company, 1 Brigade AT Company

Airborne, Mountain Brigade: 1 ERC-90 Light Armored Regiment, 3 (mountain) or 4 (airborne) Motorized Infantry Regiments. 1 towed 155mm Regiment. .1 Brigade Recon Company (double the number of VBL Milan Platoons), 1 Commando Group [4 Recon Commando Platoons (mp)]

Airmobile Brigade: 3 Combat Helicopter Regiments, 1 Transport Helicopter Regiment

Artillery Support Brigade: 2 MLRS Regiments, 1 Long-Range SAM Regiment, 4 Roland/Mistral Regiments

1980s
By the 1980s he French army has transitioned to the small armored divisions described below. These divisions were composed composed of task-organized combined arms regiments (essentially large battalions) which mixed tank and mechanized infantry companies on a permanent basis. The French doctrine saw these divisions operating on rather wide frontages, with uncovered flanks if necessary, and seeking to outflank the enemy rather than engage him frontally. Head-on engagements were eschewed except as a way to fix the enemy for an enveloping maneuver, and fighting in built-up or wooded areas was similarly to be avoided due to the low infantry strength of French units and the advantages the  artillery-heavy Soviet Army would have in such grinding attritional battles. In this regard the French army differed from the Bundeswehr which, although also a maneuver-oriented force, intended to fight for every kilometer of its homeland. Backing up the draft-based armored and infantry divisions of the metropolitan army were the expeditionary divisions of the Force d'Action Rapide, a collection of volunteer-manned light armored, parachute, mountain, airmobile, and marine units. Although intended for overseas use due to their all-volunteer manning, their capabilities would have been useful in a general NATO--Warsaw Pact conflict. Had the Cold War continued into the 1990s the French ground forces would have likely been further reorganized, with the three corps of 3-4 divisions each being replaced by two corps de manoeuvre aeroterrestre of five divisions each, plus supporting units. However, the collapse of the Soviet Union meant the French military reforms in the 1990s were pursued along different lines.

The weak point of the French ground forces was its equipment. France's strategic nuclear deterrent took up such a large portion of the defense budget that in many respects French forces lagged behind other premier NATO armies. The most notable French weakness was the failure to field a modern main battle tank during the 1980s that was comparable to the Leopard 2, the M1 Abrams, or even the somewhat less successful Challenger 1. The highly sophisticated Leclerc MBT would enter service only in the 1990s, and the relatively advanced AMX-40 was not put into production.. As a result of the French MBT lag, the French forces would have had to rely more heavily on anti-tank guided missiles, such as the Milan and HOT which, although very effective, were not purchased in sufficiently large quantities for a prolonged conventional war. Furthermore, the most modern equipment, tended to be concentrated in the forward-deployed II Corps, with I and III Corps having to make do with older equipment. Nevertheless, the French decision to emphasize its nuclear forces, and to use its conventional forces as a "tripwire" for its force de dissuasion, was probably a correct one. French ballistic missile submarines would have likely had a far greater impact on the course of a war with the Soviet Union than a few hundreds Leclerc MBTs.

Doctrine and Troop Quality
II Corps: Veteran, High Morale
I and III Corps: Regular, High Morale
Force d'Action Rapide: Veteran or Elite, Very High Morale
Doctrine: Decentralized
HQ Rating: 5
HQ Command Radius: 12 (Regiment), 16 (Division)

Cross-attachments:
Battalions m exchange companies. Companies within a battalion may exchange platoons, or platoon(s) from one company in a battalion may be attached to other company(s) in the same battalion. Brigades do not exchange or transfer battalions.


Unit Organization

Size codes: s=small, m=medium, l=large; p=platoon, c=company, b=battery

Regiments [Battalions]

Tank Regiment (54 tanks): 4 Tank Squadrons (AMX-30) (mc), 1 Mechanized Company (AMX-10P) (mc), 1 Reconnaissance Platoon [3 Panhard jeep Platoons (sp)]

Tank Regiment (70 tanks): 4 Tank Squadrons (AMX-30) (lc),
1 Reconnaissance Platoon [3 Panhard jeep Platoons (sp)]

Mechanized Infantry Regiment (early 1980s): 2 Tank Squadrons (AMX-13 or AMX-30) (sc), 2 AMX-10P Companies (mc), 2 Mechanized Infantry Companies (mc), 2 AMX-10P Platoons (sp), 2 Mechanized Infantry Platoons (sp) [AMX-10P and mech infantry platoons are permanently attached to tank squadrons. Treat as Grouped stands.], 1 120mm Mortar Battery (mb) [VAB-towed], 1 Reconnaissance Platoon
[3 Panhard jeep Platoons (sp)]

Mechanized Infantry Regiment (late 1980s): as above, but only one tank squadron (AMX-30) and 3 mechanized infantry companies.

Mechanized Infantry Regiment (VAB): 4 VAB Companies (lc), 4 Infantry Companies (mc), 1 120mm Mortar Battery (mb) [VAB-towed], 2 81mm Mortar Batteries (sb) [VAB-mounted], 1 Panhard Milan Platoon (mp), 2 20mm AA gun Platoons (mp) [VAB-towed],
1 Reconnaissance Platoon [3 Panhard jeep Platoons (sp)]

Armored Car Regiment: 3 Armored Car Squadrons (mc), 9 Panhard jeep Recon Platoons (sp), 6 Panhard Milan Platoons (sp), 3 VAB Mephisto AT Platoons (mp)

Parachute, Marine, or Mountain Regiment: 4 Infantry Companies (mc), 4 VLRA light truck companies (lc), 1 Reconnaissance Platoon [
3 Panhard jeep Platoons (sp)], 1 120mm Mortar Battery (mb) [truck], 2 81mm Mortar Batteries (sb) [truck or manportable], 4 Panhard Milan Platoons (sp), 2 20mm AA gun Platoons (sp) [truck-towed]

Artillery Regiment: 4 Batteries (mb)

Combat Helicopter Regiment: 3 Gazelle/HOT Squadrons (sc), 1 Gazelle/20mm Squadrons (sc), 1 Puma Squadron (sc)

Transport Helicopter Regiment: 4 Puma Squadrons (mc)

Divisions [Brigades]

Armored Division:
3 (54-tank) or 2 (70-tank) Tank Regiments, 2 Mechanized Infantry Regiments (AMX-10P), 1 Mechanized Infantry Regiment (VAB), 1 or 2 SP Artillery Regiments (AUF-1), 1 VAB Mephisto AT Company (mc), 1 Reconnaissance Company [12 Recon Panhard jeep Platoons (sp), 3 Panhard Milan Platoons (sp)]

Infantry Division: 1 Armored Car Regiment, 3 Mechanized Infantry Regiments (VAB), 1 Artillery Regiment [155mm towed]

Light Armored Division: 2 Armored Car Regiments (AMX-10RC), 2 Mechanized Infantry Regiments (VAB), 1 Artillery Regiment (towed 155mm)

Airmobile Division: 3 Combat Helicopter Regiments, 1 Transport Helicopter Regiment, 1 Infantry Regiment (VAB) [with 6 Panhard Milan Platoons instead of 3]

Airborne Division: 1 Armored Car Regiment (ERC-90) [squadrons are lc], 6 Parachute Regiments, 1 Artillery Regiment (towed 105mm howitzers or 120mm mortars)

Marine Division: 1 Armored Car Regiment (ERC-90), 3 Marine Regiments, 1 Arillery Regiment (towed 155mm) [By the late 1990s, 2 AMX-10RC Regiments, 2 VAB-mounted Marine Infantry Regiments]

Mountain Division: 1 Armored Car Regiment (ERC-90), 6 Mountain Infantry Regiments, 1 Artillery Regiment (105mm towed)

Corps-level Units:

Armored Car Regiment:
as above

Artillery Regiment: 
as above

Air Defense Regiment:
6 Roland SAM Platoons (mp), 4 AMX-13 DCA AA gun platoons (sp)


1970s
Just as the bloodletting of World War I has left the French military a firm believer in the prevalence of firepower over maneuver, so did France's defeat by Germany in 1940 led it to a similar swing in the direction of mobile warfare. Beginning in the 1950s, the French military began to experiment with organizational structures aimed at facilitating rapid battlefield maneuver, including the Javelot brigade and the 7e Division Mecanique Rapide. These organizations introduced the features that were first found in the Division Type 1967. However, shortages of modern equipment, caused in part by the economic crisis of the early 1970s and the expense of the French nuclear arsenal, meant that the 5 Mechanized Divisions that were to follow the Division 67 blueprint were being constituted only very slowly. By the late 970s it was decided to tailor the heavy maneuver forces to equipment that was actually available, and the 5 large mechanized divisions were replaced by 8 smaller Armored Divisions, which at first consisted of only 4 maneuver regiments (by contrast, each of the 3 brigades of a mechanized division had 3 regiments), supported by an artilery regiment.

A striking feature of the French formations of this period is the extent to which they were tank-heavy. This was particularly true of the original Armored Division organization which had 12 tank and only 6 mechanized companies. This was due to their intended mode of operations. Their tactics were closer to US Armored Cavalry Regiments (or, indeed, the pre-WW2 DLMs) in that they were not intended for holding ground. Like the DLM of 1940, the mechanized regiments were to operate like the earlier dragons portes, locating and delaying the enemy and preparing the situation for a counterstroke by the tank regiments. However, during the 1980s the heavy maneuver forces saw an increase in the proportion of infantry, through the attachment of motorized infantry divisions to the corps headquarters, addition of VAB-equipped infantry regiments to infantry divisions, and an increase in the number of infantry companies in mechanized regiments from 2 to 3.

Doctrine and Troop Quality
Draftee units: Regular or Veteran, Average or High Morale
Professional units: Veteran or Elite, Very High Morale
Doctrine: Decentralized
HQ Rating: 4 (Regular), 5 (Veteran), or 6 (Elite)
HQ Command Radius: 12 (Regiment), 16 (Brigade) Division

Cross-attachments:
Battalions m exchange companies. Companies within a battalion may exchange platoons, or platoon(s) from one company in a battalion may be attached to other company(s) in the same battalion. Brigades do not exchange or transfer battalions.


Unit Organization

Size codes: s=small, m=medium, l=large; p=platoon, c=company, b=battery

Regiments [Battalions]

Tank Regiment: 4 Tank Squadrons (AMX-30) (mc), 1 Mechanized Company (AMX-10P) (mc), 1 Reconnaissance Platoon [3 Hotchkiss jeep Platoons (sp)]

Light Tank Regiment: as Tank Regiment, but equipped with AMX-13 tanks.

Mechanized Infantry Regiment (early 1980s): 2 Tank Squadrons (AMX-13 or AMX-30) (sc), 2 AMX-10P Companies (mc), 2 Mechanized Infantry Companies (mc), 2 AMX-10P Platoons (sp), 2 Mechanized Infantry Platoons (sp) [AMX-10P and mech infantry platoons are permanently attached to tank squadrons. Treat as Grouped stands.], 1 120mm Mortar Battery (mb) [VAB-towed], 1 Reconnaissance Platoon [3 Hotchkiss jeep Platoons (sp)]

Motorized Infantry Regiment: 4 Truck Companies (lc), 4 Infantry Companies (mc), 1 120mm Mortar Battery (mb) [VAB-towed], 2 81mm Mortar Batteries (sb) [truck-towed, 1 Jeep SS-11 ATGM Platoon (mp), 2 20mm AA gun Platoons (mp) [Truck-towed],
1 Reconnaissance Platoon [3 Hotchkiss jeep Platoons (sp)]

Armored Car Regiment: 3 Armored Car Squadrons (mc), 9 Hotchkiss jeep Recon Platoons (sp), 6 Hotchkiss Jeep SS-11 ATGM Platoons (sp),

Parachute, Marine, or Mountain Regiment: 4 Infantry Companies (mc), 4 VLRA light truck companies (lc), 1 Reconnaissance Platoon [
3 Hotchkiss jeep Platoons (sp)], 1 120mm Mortar Battery (mb) [truck], 2 81mm Mortar Batteries (sb) [truck or manportable], 4 Hotchkiss jeep SS-11 ATGM Platoons (sp), 2 20mm AA gun Platoons (sp) [truck-towed]

Artillery Regiment: 3 Batteries (mb)

Combat Helicopter Regiment: 3 Alouette III/SS-11 Squadrons (sc), 1 Puma Squadron (sc)

Transport Helicopter Regiment: 4 Puma Squadrons (mc)

Brigades:

Mechanized Brigade: 1 Tank Regiment, 2 Mechanized Regiments, 
1 Reconnaissance Company [12 Recon Hotchkiss jeep Platoons (sp), 3 Hotchkiss Jeep SS-11 ATGM Platoons (sp)], 1 Artillery Regiment (SP 155mm)

Motorized Brigade: 1 Light Tank Regiment, 2 Motirized Infantry Regiments,
1 Reconnaissance Company [12 Recon Hotchkiss jeep Platoons (sp), 3 Hotchkiss Jeep SS-11 ATGM Platoons (sp)], 1 Artillery Regiment (SP 105mm)

Divisions

Mechanized Division :
3 Mechanized Brigades, or 2 Mechanized and 1 Motorized Brigade, 1 Combat Helicopter Regiment, 1 Air Defense Battalion [3 AMX-13 DCA Platoons (sp), 4 Roland Platoons (sp)] , 1 Motorized Infantry Battalion.

Airborne Division: 1 Armored Car Regiment (ERC-90) [squadrons are lc], 6 Parachute Regiments, 1 Artillery Regiment (towed 105mm howitzers or 120mm mortars)

Marine Division: 1 Armored Car Regiment (ERC-90), 3 Marine Regiments, 1 Arillery Regiment (towed 155mm)

Mountain Division: 1 Armored Car Regiment (ERC-90), 6 Mountain Infantry Regiments, 1 Artillery Regiment (105mm towed)

Corps-level Units:

Armored Car Regiment:
as above

Artillery Regiment: 
as above

Air Defense Regiment:
6 Roland SAM Platoons (mp), 4 AMX-13 DCA AA gun platoons (sp)


Unit Data:

Main Battle Tanks and Armored Cars

Leclerc Tank Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
11t
13**
G (a/a): 13

HE (a/a): M
HW: 4 [6]
--
TI, h/k

AMX-30B2 Brennus Tank Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sc, mc, or lc
8t
8*
G (a/g): 10

HE (a/g): M
HW: 4 [6]
--
TI


AMX-30B2 Tank Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sc, mc, or lc
8t
8
G (a/g): 10

HE (a/g): M
HW: 4 [6]
--
TI

AMX-30 Tank Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sc, mc, or lc
8t
8
G (g/g): 8

HE (g/g): M
HW: 4 [6]
--
IR


AMX-13 Tank Squadron (including 1 Platoon armed with SS-11 ATGMs)
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sc
8t
2
G (g/g): 8
M (sp): 11* [8]
HE (a/g): L
HW: 2 [4]
--
II


AMX-10RC Armored Car Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
8w
3 (4* from 1990)
G (a/g): 8

HE (a/g): M
HW: 2 [4]
--
II, TI from 1990

ERC-90 Sagaie Armored Car Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc or lc
8w
1
G (b/b): 8

HE (a/g): L
HW: 2 [4]
--
II

EBR Armored Car Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc or lc
8w
3
G (b/b): 6

HE (b/b): L
HW: 2 [4]
--


AML-90 Armored Car Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc or lc
8w
1
G (b/b): 8*

HE (b/b): L
HW: 2 [4]
--
IR


APCs and IFVs

 VBCI IFV Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
10w
4*
G (a/a): 4

HW: 4 [6]
--
TI. Transports infantry up to mc size.


 AMX-10P IFV Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
8t
2
G (b/b): 3

HW: 4 [6]
--
IR. Transports infantry up to mc size.

 AMX-VCI APC Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
8t
1
--

HW: 2 [6]
--
Transports infantry up to mc size.


 VAB APC Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
8w
1
--
HW: 2 [4]
--
Transports infantry up to own size.

Infantry

Mechanized Infantry Company (AMX-10P, VBCI)
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
2f
0 (0* from 1990)
CC: 4
M (g) (sc): 12* [6]
SA: 1
HW: 2 [4]
CC: 4
--
II


Motorized Infantry Company (VAB or truck)
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
2f
0 (0* from 1990)
CC: 4
M (g) (sp): 12* [6]
SA: 1
HW: 2 [4]
CC: 4
--
II

Parachute, Marine, or Mountain Infantry Company
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
2f
0 (0* from 1990)
CC: 4
M (g) (sp): 12* [6]
SA: 1
HW: 2 [4]
CC: 4
--
II

Reconnaissance

VBL Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sp
8wa
1
--

HW: 2 [4] --
TI, GSR


Panhard Jeep Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sp
8w
0
--

HW: 2 [4]
--
II, GSR

Hotchkiss Jeep Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sp
8w
0
--

HW: 2 [4]
--


Anti-Tank

 VCAC Mephisto Company/Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc or mp
8wa
1
M (g): 14* [10] HW: 2 [4]
--
TI

VBL Milan ATGM Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sp
8wa
1
M (g): 12* [6]

--
--
TI


Panhard Milan ATGM Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sp
8w
0
M (g): 12* [6]

--
--
TI

Artillery

AUF-1 GCT 155mm SP Howitzer Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb or lb
8t
1
G (b/b): 10*

HE (b): H
HW: 2 [4]
HE: H [48]


F3 155mm SP Howitzer Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb
6t
1o
G (b/b): 10*

HE (b): H
HW: 2 [4]
HE: H [40]


AU-50 105mm SP Howitzer Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb
8t
1
G (b/b): 6*

HE (b): M
HW: 2 [4]
HE: H [32]



TR 155mm Towed Howitzer Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb or lb
8lw
0/-2
G (b/b): 10*
HE (b): H
HE: H [48]


BF-50 155mm Towed Howitzer Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb
8lw
0/-2
G (b/b): 10*
HE (b): H
HE: H [40]


120mm Towed Mortar Battery (VAB)
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb 8w 0/1
0/-2 for truck-towed battery
--

-- HE: H [16]

81mm Mortar Battery
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mb 2f or 8w 0
--

-- HE: L [10]

Anti-Aircraft

Mica AA Missile Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mp
8w
-2
--

--

-- AA Missile: (a) [20]


Mistral AA Missile Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mp
8w
-2 (0 when dismounted)
--

--

-- AA Missile: (a) [10]


Roland AA Missile Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mp
8t
2
--

--

-- AA Missile: (g) [14]

AMX-13 DCA AA Gun Platoon
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sp
8t
1
G (g/g): 2

HW: 5 [8]

-- AA Gun (g/g): 5 [8]

20mm Gun Platoon, towed
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sp
8w
0/-2
G (b/b): 1

HW: 4 [6]

-- AA Gun (b/b): 2 [6]

Helicopters

Tigre Attack Helicopter Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sc
H
2/2
M (a): 14* [12]
G (a): 3
HW: 4 [6]
HE: L [6]
--
TI


Gazelle/HOT Anti-tank Helicopter Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sc
H
0/0
M (g): 14* [10]
--
--
II

Gazelle/20mm Support Helicopter Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sc
H
0/0
--
HW: 2 [6] --
II

NH-90 Transport Helicopter Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mc
H
2/1
--
--
--
Lift: troops x2 own size, jeep-type vehicles up to own size


Puma/Cougar Transport Helicopter Squadron
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
sc or mc
H
0/0
--
--
--
Lift: troops x2 own size, jeep-type vehicles up to own size

Aircraft

 Jaguar Attack Aircraft Flight
Size
Move
Protection
AT
AP
Indirect
Special
mp
A
0/2
G: 3

HW: 2
HE: VH (+1)


Mike J.
=
====
The J-8 Shop
Wargame Rules, Variants, and Orders of Battle
http://www.geocities.com/pmj6/

“That's why it really galls me when I hear my own people dismiss the French as cowards.”
Captain America, March 2005


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