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Creating Your Character
Attribute Checks
Combat
Alternative Combat Rules
Hybrid Combat Rules

 

Creating Your Character

There are 4 main character attributes: Life Points, Psi, Strength and Skill.

Life Points represents your characters health factor, and upon reaching 0 signifies death. To determine your characters Life Points, roll two dice, and add 6 to the total. During your experiences you will encounter hostile situations in which specific sources may damage you. Keep a record of your current and initial Life Points. Your current score may never surpass your initial Life Points score, unless otherwise indicated by a special incident.

You may regain Life Points by eating a meal, which restores 2 Life Points (this will only work once every 24 hours, and you must have the food available), drinking certain potions and some other means.

Psi is your characters' mental aspect. It represents all psychic instances for your character; his intelligence, his morale, etc. when such instances are required to be tested. To determine this skill, roll a six sided die three times, and add up the total. Again, the current amount may never surpass the initial unless otherwise indicated by the author.

Strength is a deciding factor when encountering certain physical conditions that require specific physical force to be applied. To determine your characters Strength, roll one six sided die three times and add the totals. It follows the same initial point guidelines as formerly indicated.

Skill is a deciding factor when encountering certain physical situations that require particular action to be executed. To determined your characters Skill, roll one six sided die three times and add the totals. It follows the same initial point guidelines as formerly indicated.
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Attribute Checks

Only three attributes are normally checked (Strength, Psi and Skill). Checking Strength and Psi is very exausting for your character, and temporarily reduces your character's current score in that attribute by 1 each time they are used. You will be told in the text when to make Strength and Psi checks, but Strength Checks may be made in combat to do extra damage - see the combat section for details.

By resting for 4 consecutive hours, or by drinking certain potions, Strength and Psi be returned to their Initial value. Other means of restoring Strength and Psi do exist, but this you must discover for yourself. Checking Skill never decreases your score, and Skill will usually go below it's Initial level only due to severe injury or some hideous curse. Should this happen to your character, you will need to seek out some means of fixing the problem, because it will not normally go away with rest.

Attribute Checks: Roll 3D6 and compare the total to your current Attribute score - if the number is lower than your current Attribute score, you have succeeded. If it is equal to the Attribute score, you may try again (or give up and consider the roll a failure) - for Strength and Psi checks, each time you try again will reduce your current Attribute score by 1. If it is higher than your current Attribute score, then you have failed.
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Combat
1. Combat is simultaneous.
2. Each creature involved in combat (including your character) may only attack one foe every combat round. You may defend yourself against an unlimited number of foes, but each foe (after the first) which attacks you increases it's effective skill score (since you are less effective in defending yourself against multiple opponants). The first creature attacking you adds nothing, the second adds 1, the third adds 2 etc.
3. Roll 3D6 for each creature involved in combat, and add the creature's current skill score. If your total is higher than that of the creature you are attacking, then you have hit the creature. If the creature's total is higher than yours, then it has hit you. If the totals are equal, then you have avoided each others blows.
4. Fighting multiple opponants: Any creature with a higher total than yours will hit and damage you, however, you may only hit one target each round, and then only if your attack total is higher than your target's. Remember, each creature after the first which attacks you effectively increases it's skill.
5. A successful hit usually inflicts 1 point of damage if your character is unarmed and has no special unarmed fighting skills. Daggers and Clubs typically inflict 2 or 3 points of damage, and Swords usually inflict 4 points of damage. You will be told how much damage a weapon or creature does in the text.
6. Strength Checks: You can inflict extra damage to your foe by making a Strength check. Roll 3D6, and if this number is less than your character's current Strength, you inflict 50% more damage to your foe (round up). If the number is equal to or greater than your character's current Strength, you will inflict 50% less damage to your foe (round down). Note that if you are unarmed, this may result in you inflicting no damage. Making a Strength check is very tiring, and you must temporarily reduce your current Strength by 1. Your strength will return to it's normal value when you rest for at least 4 hours. Monsters will not usually make strength checks.

Special Note:
Armor and shields (and other special items) can increase your character's skill and reduce the damage taken. Normally, shields increase your character's skill by 1, as does wearing Leather armor. Chainmail armor also increases your character's skill by 1, and decreases the damage taken by 1. Platemail armor is the best protection normally available, and will usually increase your character's skill by 1 and decrease damage taken by 2. Magical armors and shields may have different effects, as may some specially constructed armors and shields.

Alternative Combat Rules
Ok, here are some alternative combat rules. Note that they will replace the combat rules mentioned above, if the club members prefer them.

Each time you encounter combat, you will find a section like the one below:

Orc (Life Points 10)
Roll 2 Dice:
Score 2 to 6: You are hit - lose 3 Life Points
Score 7 to 12: Your opponant is hit, score normal weapon damage -1 (the Orc is wearing leather armor).

Fighting Multiple Opponants:
This is done by creating one section like the above for when all opponants are active, then a new section each time one of the opponants is eliminated. See the example below:

Huntsman (Life Points 12)
Hunting Dog (Life Points 6)
Roll 2 Dice:
Score 2 to 4: You are hit twice - lose 5 Life Points
Score 5 to 8: You are hit once - lose 3 Life Points
Score 9 to 12: You hit the dog (you will be unable to hit the Huntsman while the dog lives), score normal weapon damage.

Huntsman (Life Points 12)
Roll 2 Dice:
Score 2 to 6: You are hit - lose 3 Life Points
Score 7 to 12: Your opponant is hit, score normal weapon damage.

Finding weapons and armor will have varying effects. Finding a weapon will normally increase the damage you can do (a normal, unarmed human with no special unarmed combat training will do 1 point of damage for each hit), while finding armor will reduce the amount of damage (Life Points) your character receives.

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Hybrid Combat Rules
Ok, these proposed rules combine several ideas from club members, and represent my currently preferred combat format. They have the following advantages:

1. Easy to write. Most combat (even against multiple foes) would only require 2 lines. The second line can be a macro, or cut and paste.
Goblin: Skill 6.....Life Points 6
View Combat Results Table

2. Fast. This system is even faster than the Golden Dragon style. A "K" result will automatically kill all remaining foes (when fighting multiple opponants).

3. Relatively simple. Roll 2d6, add your combat ratio, look at the table.

Problems:
1. Lacks the descriptiveness of the Golden Dragon style.
2. Requires reference to a combat table.

 

 

 

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