FIREFIGHTERS
SEPTEMBER 11,2001 HEROS




Do you remember where you were on September 11,2001? I know I will always remember that day. Being a government employee and also the daughter-in-law of a fallen firefighter I can't forget!!This picture of the fireman and the angel is the most unbelievable picture I have ever seen. As the daughter in law of a fallen fire fighter this picture means a great deal to me. I never got the chance to meet my father-in-law because the the job took him away from his family way to soon. He never got to see his 3 children grow up and have a family of their on. My mother-in-law has done such a great job keeping his memory alive that I feel like I know the man as if he was with us today. I am also proud to be his daughter-in-law. After September 11, 2001 I wanted to do something that would make me feel closer to him and all the other heros we lost on that horrible day. So I had the fireman and angel tattooed over my heart for not only my father-in-law but for every fireman that risk their life everyday to help us. People they don't even know. If those firefighters had September 11, 2001 to do over I would bet that they would not have changed one thing. SO TO ALL OF YOU LET ME SAY THANK YOU AND YOU WILL ALWAYS BE IN MY HEART (and over it)






You monster. You beast. You unspeakable bastard.What lesson did you hope to teach us by your coward's attack on our World Trade Center, our Pentagon, us? What was it you hoped we would learn? Whatever it was, please know that you failed. Did you want us to respect your cause? You just damned your cause. Did you want to make us fear? You just steeled our resolve. Did you want to tear us apart? You just brought us together. Let me tell you about my people. We are a vast and quarrelsome family, a family rent by racial, cultural, political and class division, but a family nonetheless. We're frivolous, yes, capable of expending tremendous emotional energy on pop cultural minutiae, a singer's revealing dress, a ball team's misfortune, a cartoon mouse. We're wealthy, too, spoiled by the ready availability of trinkets and material goods, and maybe because of that, we walk through life with a certain sense of blithe entitlement. We are fundamentally decent, though-peace-loving and compassionate. We struggle to know the right thing and to do it. And we are, the overwhelming majority of us, people of faith, believers in a just and loving God. Some people - you, perhaps - think that any or all of this makes us weak. You're mistaken. We are not weak. Indeed, we are strong in ways that cannot be measured by arsenals. Yes, we're in pain now. We are in mourning and we are in shock. We're still grappling with the unreality of the awful thing you did, still working to make ourselves understand that this isn't a special effect from some Hollywood blockbuster, isn't the plot development from a Tom Clancy novel. Both in terms of the awful scope of its ambition and the probable final death toll, your attacks are likely to go down as the worst acts of terrorism in the history of the United States and, indeed, the history of the world. You've bloodied us as we have never been bloodied before. But there's a gulf of difference between making us bloody and making us fall. This is the lesson Japan was taught to its bitter sorrow the last time anyone hit us this hard, the last time anyone brought us such abrupt and monumental pain. When roused, we are righteous in our outrage, terrible in our force. When provoked by this level of barbarism, we will bear any suffering, pay any cost, go to any length, in the pursuit of justice. I tell you this without fear of contradiction. I know my people, as you, I think, do not. What I know reassures me. It also causes me to tremble with dread of the future. In days to come, there will be recrimination and accusation, fingers pointing to determine whose failure allowed this to happen and what can be done to prevent it from happening again. There will be heightened security, misguided talk of revoking basic freedoms. We'll go forward from this moment sobered,chastened, sad. But determined, too. Unimaginably determined. You see, there is steel beneath this velvet. That aspect of our character is seldom understood by people who don't know us well. On this day, the family's bickering is put on hold. As Americans we will weep, as Americans we will mourn, and as Americans, we will rise in defense of all that we cherish. Still, I keep wondering what it was you hoped to teach us. It occurs to me that maybe you just wanted us to know the depths of your hatred. If that's the case, consider the message received. And take this message in exchange: You don't know my people. You don't know what we're about. You don't know what you just started. But you're about to learn
By Leonard Pitts Jr. Syndicated columnist / Seattle Times




americansalute.gif



Bin Laden's Liquors Game

Just a few pictures that touched me

























Can you imagine being this mother having to tell her son this? It was late one Tuesday evening, Before a mother could sit down, To tell her only child about The terror that hit downtown. She looked into the eyes of her son God, she loved him so, She felt her heart begin to break And the hurt begin to show. She gathered all her strength and courage, as her story she began to tell. "Baby don't cry, but I'm afraid daddy Might be under a building that fell." The boy looked back at his mother, His eyes made not one blink. And the mother's tears began to fall. What would her baby think? You see, his dad is a firefighter, And his hero from the day of his birth. He loved his dad more than anything else That could ever inherit this earth. The mother's head began to drop, Her forehead resting on palm. She thought her son would be upset. Instead, he was very calm. The boy leaned over towards his mom, And put his hand upon her head. In her ear he began to whisper, And this is what he said: "Mommy please don't cry, I knew daddy wasn't coming home. I talked to him just a while ago, But it wasn't on the phone. He told me that he loved me, And he promised we'd meet again. He told of his new home, And the job he was to begin." "God is building an army, And there are many angels needed. That, is where daddy and the others went. They weren't all defeated." It was then, the mother lifted her head. The tears streamed down her face. And she could feel her husband's presence, As it filled her heart with grace. It was then she knew her son was right. He was in God's great army now. She also knew her son was safe, That he'd be kept from harm somehow. So, evil-doers of the world beware. An army is on the way. Bolstered by new angels, Who left the towers that day.. Their commander has never been beaten. His power has never been matched, And if evil thinks He was almighty before...... Well, the surface has just been scratched!





THE TODD BEAMER STORY

"JESUS HELP ME" The Faith of Todd Beamer "I don't think we're going to get out of this thing. I'm going to have to go out on faith." It was the voice of Todd Beamer, the passenger -- and Wheaton College graduate -- who said "Let's roll" as he led the charge against the terrorists who had hijacked United Flight 93, the one, you will remember, that crashed in the Pennsylvania countryside. The whole world knows how brave Beamer and his fellow passengers were on September 11. But this week we learned more fully what buttressed that bravery: Faith in Jesus Christ. Todd died as he lived, a faithful evangelical believer. In an article titled "The Real Story of Flight 93," Newsweek reveals gripping new details from the actual transcripts of the now-recovered cockpit voice recorder. "Todd had been afraid," Newsweek relates. "More than once, he cried out for his Savior." After passengers were herded to the back of the jet, Beamer called the GTE Customer Center in Oakbrook, Illinois. He told supervisor Lisa Jefferson about the hijacking. The passengers were planning to jump the terrorists, he said. And then he asked her to pray with him. As Newsweek relates, "Beamer kept a Lord's Prayer bookmark in his Tom Clancy novel, but he didn't need any prompting. He began to recite the ancient litany, and Jefferson joined him: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name." As they finished, Beamer added, "Jesus, help me." And then, Beamer and his fellow passengers prayed a prayer that has comforted millions down through the centuries -- the prayer that David wrote in a time of great anguish: The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want . . . Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil. And then the famous last words: "Are you guys ready? Let's roll." We now know from the cockpit voice recorder that Beamer and other passengers wrestled with the hijackers and forced the plane to crash into the ground, killing themselves but foiling what was believed to have been the hijackers' plan to fly Flight 93 into the Capitol or the White House. As Christians, we know that God can bring good out of evil. In Todd Beamer, the world witnesses a faith that held up in the extremity of fear. A faith that is even now comforting his widow and two young sons. Lisa Beamer told NBC's Dateline, "You know, in the Lord's Prayer, it asks us to forgive our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us." As Todd prayed this prayer in the last moments of his life, in a way, Lisa said, "He was forgiving those people for what they were doing, the most horrible thing you could ever do to someone. It wasn't Todd Beamer's job to fight terrorists. He was just a passenger who along with several others did what he didn't have to do but foiled a terrible evil that might have been done to his country. As Flight 93 hurtled towards destruction, Todd Beamer could not have known that his quiet prayers would ultimately be heard by millions-- that the story of his last acts on earth would be a witness to the Lord he loved and served and a lasting example of true heroism.







Sign Guestbook View Guestbook


Counter








1
Hosting by WebRing.