Master CB!
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Join The Trinity Clan ~T~ by going to http://www.trinity-clan.com Online Gaming Ministry Since I have a very deep relationship with jesus, check out my own christian website at http://www.geocities.com/jesusglow other sites are www.unshackled.org. www.intouch.org, www.jhm.org, www.jsm.org

I'm just a kid that wants to help the people with cb radio.

Keeping the america sprit alive is my goal an nothing fits the america sprit more then a truck and a old cb.

My name Jared aka Turbo on the cb. Just like my other one did.

Sioux Falls South Dakota Trucker Information

If you ever go to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, turn your channel to 6 or 19, an you will hear something I hope . An Flying J Truckstop is the biggest truckstop in the tri-state area called the Flying J Truck Stop. An if you go on North Cliff Ave. in SF then you will find a store at the Sinclair Station (the truck stop with the little green dinosaur) called Dakota CB an let me tell ya that this is the real deal for cb's in South Dakota.

The "Q" Signals For Sidebanders

QRQ WHAT IS MY EXACT FREQUENCY? | YOUR EXACT FREQUENCY IS___________


QRH DOES MY FREQUENCY VARY? | YOUR FREQUENCY VARIES.


QRL ARE YOU BUSY? | I AM BUSY.


QRM IS MY TRANSMISSION BE INTERFERED WITH? | YOUR SIGNAL IS BEING INTERFERED WITH.


QRN ARE YOU TROUBLED BY STATIC? | I AM TROUBLED BY STATIC.


QRT SHALL I STOP TRANSMITTING? | STOP TRANSMITTING.


QRX THIS STATION IS GOING OFF THE AIR (OR ON STANDBY)

QSB ARE MY SIGNALS FADING? | YOUR SIGNALS ARE FADING.


QSL CAN YOU ACKNOWLEDGE? | I AM/WILL/CAN ACKNOWLEDGE.


QSM SHALL I REPEAT? | PLEASE REPEAT.


QSO CAN YOU COMMUNICATE WITH _______________? | I CAN COMMUNICATE WITH ___________________.


QSP WILL YOU RELAY TO ________? | I WILL RELAY TO _______________.


QSY SHALL I CHANGE FREQUENCY? | CHANGE FREQUENCY TO ________.


QTH WHAT IS YOUR LOCATION? | MY LOCATION IS ________________.


QTR WHAT IS THE CORRECT TIME? | THE CORRECT TIME IS ___________.


QTX THIS STATION IS TROUGH TRANSMITTING AND WILL BE STANDING BY FOR FURTHER COMMUNICATIONS.


CQ A GENERAL CALL WITH NO PARTICULAR STATION IN MIND -- USED ONLY WHEN THERE IS NO TRAFFIC ON THE FREQUENCY.


CQ DX A GENERAL CALL WITH NO PARTICULAR STATION IN MIND -- USED ONLY WHEN TRYING TO MAKE AN OUT OF TOWN CONTACT



Whiskey Codes 
1 DELAWARE
2 PENN.
3 NEW JERSEY
4 GEORGIA
5 CONN.
6 MASS.
7 MARYLAND
8 S. CAROLINA
9 NEW HAMP.
10 VIRGINIA
11 NEW YORK
12 N. CAROLINA
13 R.I.
14 VERMONT
15 KENTUCKY
16 TENN.
17
18 LOUISIANA
19 INDIANA
20 MISS.
21 ILLINOIS
22 ALABAMA
23 MAINE
24 MISSOURI
25 ARKANSAS
26 MICHIGAN
27 FLORIDA
28 TEXAS
29 IOWA
30 WISCONSIN
31 CALIF.
32 MINNESOTA
33 OREGON
34 KANSAS
35 W. VIRGINIA
36 NEVADA
37 NEBRASKA
38 COLORADO
39 N. DAKOTA
40 S. DAKOTA
41 MONTANA
42 WASHINGTON
43 IDAHO
44 WYOMING
45 UTAH
46 OKLAHOMA
47 NEW MEXICO
48 ARIZONA
49 ALASKA
50 HAWAII
51 N. BRUNS.
52 QUEBEC
53 GREENLAND
54 ONTARIO
55 MANITOBA
56 SASK.
57 ALBERTA
58 BRIT. COL.
59 MEXICO
60 W. INDES
61 PUERTORICO
62 PANAMA
63 VENEZUELA
64 BRAZIL
65 ARGENTINA
66 CHILE
67 AUSTRALIA
68 GUAM
69 JAPAN
70 ENGLAND
71 GERMANY
72 FRANCE
73 ITALY
74 SWEDEN
75 IRELAND
76 SPAIN
77 NORWAY
78 FINLAND
79 POLAND
80 SWITZERLAND


Ten Codes
10-1 Receiving poorly

10-2 Receiving well

10-3 Stop transmitting

10-4 OK, message received

10-5 Relay message

10-6 Busy, stand by

10-7 Out of service, leaving air

10-8 In service, subject to call

10-9 Repeat message

10-10 Transmission completed, standing by

10-11 Talking too rapidly

10-12 Visitors present

10-13 Advise Weather/Road conditions

10-16 Make pick up at

10-17 Urgent business

10-18 Anything for us?

10-19 Nothing for you, return to base

10-20 My location is

10-21 Call by telephone

10-22 Report in person to

10-23 Stand by

10-24 Completed last assignment

10-25 Can you contact

10-26 Disregard last information

10-27 I am moving to channel

10-28 Identify your station

10-29 Time is up for contact

10-30 Does not conform to FCC rules

10-32 I will give you a radio check

10-33 Emergency traffic

10-34 Trouble at this station

10-35 Confidential information

10-36 Correct time is

10-37 Wrecker needed at

10-38 Ambulance needed at

10-39 Your message delivered

10-41 Please turn to channel

10-42 Traffic accident at

10-43 Traffic Tie up at

10-44 I have a message for you

10-45 All units within range please report

10-50 Break channel

10-60 What is next message number?

10-62 Unable to copy, use phone

10-63 Net directed to

10-64 Net clear

10-65 Awaiting your next message/assignment

10-67 All units comply

10-70 Fire at

10-71 Proceed with transmission in sequence

10-77 Negative contact

10-81 Reserve hotel room for

10-82 Reserve room for

10-84 My telephone number is

10-85 My address is

10-91 Talk closer to mike

10-93 Check my frequency on this channel

10-94 Please give me a long count

10-99 Mission completed, all units secure

10-200 Police needed at

The following chart shows the 11 metre band division numbers that are internationally agreed by DX organisations. You will hear these used particularly on the SSB channels.

1 Italy 115 Qatar 229 Heard Islands
2 U.S.A 116 Turkey 230 Micronesia
3 Brazil 117 Egypt 231 St Peter/St Paul Rocks
4 Argentina 118 Gambia 232 Aruba
5 Venezuela 119 Madiera Islands 233 Romania
6 Colombia 120 Antigua/Barbuda 234 Afghanistan
7 Netherland Antilles 121 Bahamas 235 I.T.U. Geneva
8 Peru 122 Barbados 236 Bangladesh
9 Canada 123 Bermuda 237 Myanmar (Burma)
10 Mexico 124 Amsterdam/St Paul Islands 238 Kampuchea
11 Puerto Rico 125 Cayman Islands 239 Laos
12 Uruguay 126 Nicaragua 240 Macao
13 Rep. Germany 127 U.S. Virgin Islands 241 Spratly Islands
14 France 128 British Virgin Islands 242 Vietnam
15 Switzerland 129 Macquarie Islands 243 Agalega/St. Brandon
16 Belgium 130 Norfolk Islands 244 Pagalu
17 Hawaiian Islands 131 British Guyana 245 Niger
18 Greece 132 Marshall Islands 246 Sao Thome/Principe
19 Holland 133 Northern Marianas 247 Navassa Islands
20 Norway 134 Belau 248 Turks/Caicos Islands
21 Sweden 135 Solomon 249 Hill Cook Islands
22 French Guiana 136 Martinique 250 South Cook Islands
23 Jamaica 137 Isle Of Man 251 Albania
24 Panama 138 Vatican City 252 Revilla/Gigedo Islands
25 Japan 139 Deleted 253 Andaman/Nicobar Islands
26 England 140 Antartica 254 Mount Athos
27 Iceland 141 St Pierre/Miquelon 255 Kerguelen Islands
28 Honduras 142 Lesotho 256 Prince Edward/Marion Islands
29 Ireland 143 St. Lucia 257 Rodriguez Islands
30 Spain 144 Easter Islands 258 Tristan De Cunha/Gough Islands
31 Portugal 145 Galapagos Islands 259 Tromelin Is
32 Chile 146 Algeria 260 Baker/Howland Islands
33 Alaska 147 Tunisia 261 Chatham Islands
34 Canary Islands 148 Ascension Islands 262 Johnston Islands
35 Austria 149 Laccadive Islands 263 Kermadec Islands
36 Rep. San Marino 150 Bahrain 264 Kingman Reef
37 Dominican Rep. 151 Iraq 265 Central Kiribati
38 Greenland 152 Maldives 266 Eastern Kiribati
39 Angola 153 Thailand 267 Kure Islands
40 Liechtenstein 154 Iran 268 Lord Howe Islands
41 New Zealand 155 Taiwan 269 Mellish Reef
42 Liberia 156 Cameroon 270 Minami Torishima
43 Australia 157 Montserrat 271 Nauru
44 Rep. South Africa 158 Trinidad & Tobago 272 Niue Islands
45 Serbia 159 Somali Democratic Rep. 273 Palmyra/Jarvis Islands
46 Deleted 160 Sudan 274 Pitcairn Islands
47 Denmark 161 Poland 275 Tokelau Islands
48 Saudi Arabia 162 Zaire 276 Tuvalu
49 Balearic Islands 163 Wales 277 Sable Islands
50 European Russia 164 Togo 278 Wake Islands
51 Andorra 165 Sardinia 279 Willis Islands
52 Faroe Islands 166 Sint Maarten 280 Aves Islands
53 El Salvador 167 Jersey 281 Ogasawara Islands
54 Luxembourg 168 Mauritius 282 Auckland/Campbell Islands
55 Gibraltar 169 Guernsey 283 St Christopher & Nevis
56 Finland 170 Bourkina Faso 284 St Paul Islands
57 India 171 Bear Islands/Svalbard 285 Fernando De Noronha
58 East Malaysia 172 New Caledonia 286 Juan Fernandez Islands
59 Dodecanese (Rhodes) 173 Reunion Islands 287 Malpelo Islands
60 Hong Kong 174 Uganda 288 San Felix/Ambrosia Islands
61 Ecuador 175 Chad 289 South Georgia Is
62 Guam Islands 176 Central Africa Rep. 290 Trinidade Martin Vaz Islands
63 St Helena Islands 177 Sri Lanka 291 Dhekelia/Akrotiri
64 Senegal 178 Bulgaria 292 Deleted
65 Sierra Leone 179 Deleted 293 Guinea Bassau
66 Mauritania 180 Sultinate of Oman 294 Peter 1st Islands
67 Paraguay 181 Syria 295 Southern Sudan
68 N. Ireland 182 Republic of Guinea 296 Clipperton Islands
69 Costa Rica 183 Benin 297 Bouvet Islands
70 American Samoa 184 Burundi 298 Crozet Islands
71 Midway Islands 185 Comoros 299 Desecheo Islands
72 Guatemala 186 Djibouti 300 Western Sahara
73 Surinam 187 Kenya 301 Armenia
74 Namibia 188 Madagascar 302 Asiatic Russia
75 Azores Is 189 Mayotte 303 Azerbaijan
76 Morocco 190 Seychelles 304 Estonia
77 Ghana 191 Swaziland 305 Franz Josef Land
78 Zambia 192 Cocos Islands (Amer) 306 Georgia
79 Philippines 193 Cocos/Keeling Islands 307 Kaliningradsk
80 Bolivia 194 Dominican Republic 308 Kazakhstan
81 San Andres /Providencia 195 Grenada 309 Kirghizstan
82 Guantanamo Bay 196 Guadeloupe 310 Latvia
83 Tanzania 197 Vanuatu 311 Lithuania
84 Ivory Coast 198 Falkland Islands 312 Moldavia
85 Zimbabwe 199 Equatorial Guinea 313 Tadzhikstan
86 Nepal 200 South Shetland Islands 314 Turkmanistan
87 Deleted 201 French Polynesia 315 Ukraine
88 Cuba 202 Bhutan 316 Uzbekistan
89 Nigeria 203 Rep Of China 317 White Russia
90 Crete 204 Mozambique 318 S. M. Order of Malta
91 Indonesia 205 Cape Verde 319 Un. Hq. New York
92 Libya 206 Ethiopia 320 Banaba Is
93 Malta 207 French St. Martin 321 Conway Reef
94 United Arab Emirates 208 Glorioso Islands 322 Walvis Bay
95 Mongolia 209 Juan De Nova 323 Yemen Rep
96 Tonga 210 Wallis/Futuna Islands 324 Penguin Is
97 Israel 211 Jan Mayen Islands 325 Rotuma Is
98 Singapore 212 Aland Islands 326 Malyj Vysotskij Islands
99 Pill 213 Market Reef 327 Slovenia
100 Korea 214 Congo 328 Croatia
101 Papau New Guinea 215 Gabon 329 Czech Rep
102 Kuwait 216 Mali 330 Slovakia
103 Haiti 217 Christmas Islands 331 Bosnia Herzegovina
104 Corsica 218 Belize 332 FYR Macedonia
105 Botswana 219 Anguilla 333 Eritree
106 Ceuta Mellila 220 St Vincent & Grenadine 341 Gozo
107 Monaco 221 South Orkney Islands    
108 Scotland 222 South Sandwich Islands    
109 Hungary 223 Western Samoa    
110 Cyprus 224 Western Kirbati    
111 Jordan 225 Brunei    
112 Lebanon 226 Malawi    
113 West Malaysia 227 Rwanda    
114 Pakistan 228 Chagos Islands

How To Talk Like A CB'er

Advertising: Description of a patrol car with its lights (including the "Bubble Gum Machine") operating: "We've got a Smokey advertising at marker one-two-seven."
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A little bit of help: Extra Power, running an amplifier.
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Affirmative: Yes, 10-4.
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Alligator: Refers to a retread which has come off a tire and is lying on the roadway. "Watch out for the alligator in the granny land by the one five six mile marker!"
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Alligator station: All mouth and no ears, a yapper.
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Anchored modulator: Base station operator.
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Appliance operator: An in-experienced CB operator.
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Back: Term used to tell another you're ending your transmission and want him to begin transmitting to you: "Come back."
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Back Door: Behind a vehicle. "You're at my back door" or "I'll cover the back door." Used on highways to establish relative position. Also the designation of the station at the rear of a highway caravan of trucks watching for Smokies coming up behind. See also "Front Door" and "Rocking Chair."
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Back Down: To slow down your vehicle's speed by removing or easing up your foot on the accelerator (hammer). "Back down, rocking chair, we have a Smokey coming up behind us."
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Back'Em Up (Off): Slow down by pulling one's foot off the accelerator.

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Back Out: One of a number of terms used to announce that you intend to stop transmitting and therefore conclude the conversation. "Let me back out of here for now."
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Bad Scene: A term borrowed from the youth culture and applied to a crowded CB channel subject to many overlapping transmissions (layers). A real bad scene occurs during periods of high sunspot activity when skip conditions bring in stations hundreds of miles away.
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Ballet Dancer: A swaying antenna, usually a bumper-mounted whip or fiberglass ears.
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Band Bender: Side Band operator
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Band Aid Wrapper: An ambulance. Also see "Wrapper."
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Barefoot: Using only legal transmitter power: "I'm barefoot." Barefoot or "clean-cut" (the FCC is ruthless about the use of linear amplifiers &#8216;snowshoes&#8217;).
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Barley Pop: A beverage made from barley and hops - beer.
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Base (Base Station): A CB transceiver located in an apartment, home, or business that is a fixed location, as opposed to a mobile unit installed in a vehicle.
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Basement: Channel one.
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Bear: Police.
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Bear cave: Police station.
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Bear in the Air: A state patrolman in a helicopter or light plane who spots and clocks speeders. See "Smokey."
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Bear in the Bushes: Police hiding.
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Bear Bait: Someone driving over the limit with no radio.
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Bear Bite: Speeding ticket
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Beast: Unaffectionate term for CB transceiver: "The beast is only putting out three watts." Usually a rig that is not operating properly.
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Beaver: Woman or girl.
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Be-Bop: Tone signals transmitted by a radio control (RC) transmitter or a selective calling system that turns on a mobile transceiver when the correct code is received. RC signals are heard only on Channel 23, which is a shared frequency.
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Big Charlie: Also known as the Big Double-C - the Federal Communications Commission. Originally a ham term.
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Big Daddy: Not the benevolent person who helps young lovelies to cope with the world but rather he Federal Communications Commission.
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Big Ears: A good receiver.
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Big Slab: A big slab of concrete is an expressway.
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Big Switch: The on-off control. Usually used in telling another that you intend to leave the air: "Time to pull the big switch, 01' Buddy."
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Big Ten-Four: Hearty agreement with what the other operator has just said: "That's a big ten-four, Big Bopper."
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Black Water: Trucker's term for coffee.
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Bleeding: Interference caused by a station operating on a channel adjacent to yours: "Someone's bleeding on you" or "We got some bleedover." See also "step on" and "walk on."
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Blessed Event: A new arrival in the family - a bouncing new CB rig. The cries will come from the spouse who learns what delivery cost.
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Blew My Doors Off: To be passed by a vehicle traveling at high speed (usually at greater than the speed limit).
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Bootlegger: Illegal radio operator who does not have a license to operate on the frequency he is using. CB bootleggers either do not have a valid station license or use frequencies other than the authorized CB channels.
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Boulevard: An interstate highway, also referred to as the "Big Slab."
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Boy Scouts: A somewhat less common name for state patrolmen, who are generally known as "Smokies" or "Bears."
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Box: A linear amplifier, also known as a "linear snowshoes," or "footwarmer," that illegally boosts a CB transmitter's power beyond the maximum allowed by the FCC: "The rig's gonna sound better soon. I'm gonna get a box."
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Break: Often used to initiate communications with another station. Used in a variety of ways,- e.g., break for information (request to anyone who hears the call to respond with information), break for anyone on (request, usually for a Smokey report or road conditions), for anyone on a certain highway, etc.
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Breaker: A term, along with "Break," used when a CB operator wants others on a channel to break off routine chatter: "Breaker. Breaker.,, Also refers to the person who is calling: "Hold on, Pink Panther, we got a breaker." See also "button-pusher."
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Breaking Up: A received signal is being interfered with for some reason. "You're breakin' up, good buddy."
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Breaking Wind: The lead vehicle in a group of vehicles in communication by CB. See also "Front Door" and "Shaking the Trees."
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Brush Your Teeth and Comb Your Hair: Phrase used to tell another he's approaching a radar-equipped police car ("Picture Taker"). To look your best means you've got to be legal.
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Bubblegummer: A teenage CB operator.
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Bug Out: Youth culture term used to politely (?) request someone to leave the channel: "Bug out, breaker" might be used by someone in a group that is hogging a channel. See "Cartel" and "Goon Squad" for them.
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Button-Pusher: A breaker who is illegally attempting to interrupt transmissions on a channel by "keying-up" so as to transmit the AM carrier alone. Also, someone who is attempting to interrupt on-going transmissions by transmitting a "break" call.
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Cartel: This term is the name of a parlor game, but the game among CBers is called channel hogging, an illegal practice. The group playing the game is known as a cartel.
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Cash Register: A toll booth.
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Chicken Coop: A weigh-in station for trucks.
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Chopped Top: A very short CB antenna.
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Chrome Dome: A mobile antenna mounted on the roof of a four-wheeler (car). Used to help another CBer identify your car: "I'm in a blue Dodge with a chrome dome."
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City Kitty: A local policeman, also known as a "Local Yokel."
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Citizens Band: A band of assigned frequencies in the 11 meter Bandwith which is alot of fun to operate on.
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Clean Cut: An unmodified CB transceiver that complies with FCC power output regulations by not being used in conjunction with a linear power amplifier. An interchangeable term is "barefoot."
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Cleaner Channel: A less congested CB channel, freer of interference "Let's find a cleaner channel. Standby while I step down to check out the lower channels,"
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Clear: A radiotelephone term that has been used for a long time. To clear the radio channel in use by ending the transmission: "This is K-0-K1-0-4-0, we're clear."
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Coffee Break: CBers in an area who get together informally to socialize, usually at a drive-in. Also to provide free coffee to motorists at interstate highway rest areas on long holiday weekends.
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Coke Stop: A euphemism for a stop to visit the restroom.
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Comeback: A reply from another operator to your call for anyone who might be listening: "Appreciate the comeback, Zodiac, can you tell us how to get to &#8230;."
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Come on: Phrase used to tell another operator to talk. Used interchangeably with "come back" and "over."
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Convoy: A group of vehicles traveling together, -usually at a higher than legal speed.
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Copy: To receive a radio transmission with sufficient clarity to understand the message. " I copy, Rolling Stone." "Anyone with a copy, come in."
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Copy the Mail: To monitor CB transmissions by others. Also known as "Read the Mail."
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Copyright: A legal claim to information or objects. CBMW has a copyright on this information.
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County Mountie: A county sheriff or his patrol car.
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Covered Up: Interference., usually by another operator using the same channel, causes the received signal to be covered up. Your response is to tell the other operator to "come again" or "ten-ten." Synonymous terms are "walked on" and "stepped on."
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Cub Scouts: The local sheriff and his men. Generally they do not grow up to become Boy Scouts (state patrolmen). Cub Scouts also may be called "local yokels."
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Cut the Coax: A euphemism for concluding a transmission. Cutting the coax lead from the transceiver would put you off the air if done literally. You're going off the air, which is also pulling the "big switch" or "the plug."
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Daddy-0: The Federal Communications Commission, also known as "Big Daddy."
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Dirty Side: The bottom of a tractor trailer, usually used when one is seen flipped over.
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Dog: A Greyhound Bus.
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Double-jointed Corn Flakes Box: A Consolidated Freightways (CF) tractor with a double trailer. Double trailers once were endearingly called "widow makers."
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Double-Keying: A practice where an operator will depress the transmit key on his microphone twice in fast succession. May be used at the beginning of a transmission, or at the end, but is illegal in both cases.
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Double Nickel: Two five's, or 55, the present speed limit on interstate highways.
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Double Van Gogh: Having no "ears." Signal is out or antenna is broken.
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Down: Off the air, as in "We're down." Usually used to announce the end of transmission in the senses of "We're gone" or "We'll be on the side."
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Draggin'Wagon: A vehicle that pulls another - a wrecker.
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Dress for Sale: A lady of the evening or prostitute, also known as a "Pavement Princess."
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Ears: CB antennas, especially the pairs that are mounted on a truck: "He's got ears." Also known as "flappers."
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Eighteen-Wheeler: A semi-trailer with eighteen wheels.
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Eighty-Eight (88): Originally a ham (amateur) radio abbreviation that stood for love and kisses. Sometimes used by CB operators in closing a transmission, particularly as in "Gotta go now, so we'll throw you the three's and eight's." (Three's is a variant of "seventy-three" for "best regards.") Eight's and three's together are known as the "good numbers."
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Eleven Meters: The CB band.
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Eyeball: To meet personally or to see. Frequently among heterosexual CB contacts: "I'd like to eyeball you." On the road: "We got an eyeball on a Smokey in the grass at marker two-two-zero."
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Eye in the Sky: Airborne observation, as by a police helicopter, also known as a "Bear in the Air."
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Feed the Bears: To receive a ticket or to pay a fine: "I had to feed the bears." (Had to pay a speeding ticket, usually in "green stamps.")
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Fifty Dollar Lane: The passing lane on an interstate highway.
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First Personal: Your first name.
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Flag-waver: The flagman controlling traffic in a road construction area.
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Flappers: Another name for CB antennas, which also are called "ears." Antennas stick out and f lap in the wind.
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Flat Side: The horizontal polarization (Going to sleep).
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Flat Talking: Talking on the ground wave.
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Flip Side: A return trip, also known as the "flip flop," used by truckers and commuters alike.
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Fog Lifter: Someone who brings something to a channel - an interesting CBer. See also "Sunbeam."
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Foot Warmer: A linear amplifier.
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Four-Wheeler: A passenger car.
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Friendly Candy Company: The first letters form the acronym FCC Federal Communications Commission - which CBers do not find particularly friendly, generous, or good company.
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Front Door: In front of a vehicle. Also, the lead truck in a highway caravan that is the first to spot a Smokey and can give this advance notice to other vehicles. See also "back door" and "rocking chair."
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Fugitive: A CBer who's not operating on his favorite channel for whatever the reason.
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Get 'em off: Exit ramp.
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Get 'em on: Entrance ramp.
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Get Out: To get the radio signal out so it can be received by another operator. CBers wondering whether they're getting out ask for a "radio check."
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Glory Card: A Class D CB station license. It should be displayed at the base station and the three letters and four numbers of the call sign should be properly used in transmissions.
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Go-Go Girls: Truckers' term for honest-to-goodness farm animals - pigs. Why pigs are associated with go-go girls is unknown.
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Good Buddy: Like "Ole' Buddy," a term used among truckers and others as a salutation when the other operator's handle is unknown: "Hey, good buddy, we're here over your shoulder."
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Goodies: Accessories or extras that sweeten up CB operations.
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Good Numbers: Eighty-eight (love and kisses) and seventy-three (best regards): "Time to go now, so we'll throw you the good numbers."
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Goon Squad: Channel hoggers, also known as "savages" or collectively as a "cartel."
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Gotta Copy? Do you hear me?
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Gone: Off the air, often used in concluding a transmission as in "We're gone" or "We gone!" Synonymous with "down" or "on the side."
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Granny lane: Slowest moving lane on a highway.
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Grass: The median strip of an interstate highway, as in "We've got a Smokey in the grass at marker two-one-eight."
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Green Stamps: Money to pay a speeding fine. Smokey: "I'm gonna collect some green stamps." (Catch a speeder and write a ticket requiring payment of a fine.)
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Hag Feast: A group of female CBers chewing the rag on a public communications medium to which anyone can listen is known as a hag feast.
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Hammer: The accelerator pedal, usually of a truck but applicable to four wheelers and other vehicles as welt. Truckers "put down the hammer" or "hammer down" (accelerate) when Smokies aren't in sight
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Handle: An adopted nickname used for identification by CBers; for example, Gremlin, Geneses Bear, "Thanks for the comeback, K-E-D0-5-2-1, what's your handle?"
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Happy Number: A good or excellent reading on the relative signal strength meter ("S" meter).
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High Gear: Euphemism for the use of a linear amplifier, also called a "box" or "snowshoes," that illegally increases the output power. High gear is equated with high power.
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Hammer lane: Fastest lane on a highway.
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Holler: A call, as in "to give a holler" to a fellow CBer: "Hey, good buddy, you give us a holier when you get to your home twenty."
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Home Twenty: Home location The twenty is an abbreviated ten-code for location "I've been sitting here copying the mail at the home twenty."
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How About?: "How about that Golden Eagle?" Used to establish contact with another CBer, usually when calling for a specific person. The more general call is "break" or "breaker."

India

Idiot Box: Television.

In a short: Soon.

Invitations: Traffic tickets.

Is that a Four? Did you copy? Do you agree?



Juliet

Jamboree: An event planned by CBers, usually a club, at some outdoor location, usually with some combination of food and refreshments, games, activities, CB product displays, prize drawings, and entertainment.



Kilo

Keyboard: Controls on the front panel of a CB transceiver.

Key-up: To broadcast an AM carrier wave by depressing the transmit key (switch) without modulation (i.e., without a voice message).

Kiddie Car: A school bus.

Kicker: A linear amplifier.

Knock It Down: Go down to another channel.



Lima

Land Line: A telephone line.

Legal Beagle: A CBer who abides by all the FCC rules, including the correct use of his call sign.

Linear: A radio frequency amplifier that illegally increases a CB transceiver's output power. Also referred to as a "box" or being with ,,snowshoes" or in "high gear."

Local Yokel: A village or city police officer: the local constabulary.

Lollipop: Microphone. Usually used in discussing how close an operator is holding his microphone. "Don't lick the lollipop" translates to "Don't speak so close to the mike."



Mike

Mail: On-the-air conversations that may be heard (monitored) by others. Listening to others talk is usually referred to as "opening the mail" or "reading the mail."

Make the Trip: To get the transmitted signal from the transmitter to the receiver of another station. Often "you're making the trip" in the same sense of "your signal is reaching me," especially when referring to long distances.

Mama Bear: A female policeman or police person.

Man in Blue: A policeman.

Man in Slicker: Not a flasher, who serves himself, but a fireman, who serves others. So named because of the slicker raincoat he wears.

Man in White: A doctor or ambulance attendant.

Mercy: A convenient way of avoiding the use of illegal on-the-air profanity. "Mercy me, that is one strong signal," instead of "Hell, that's one bodacious signal."

Mile Marker: The small signs on interstate highways that tell you the number of miles of highway from the state line where the highway began. A convenient way of pinpointing the location of an accident, a vehicle in distress or a Smokey.

Mobile: A transceiver located in a mobile vehicle, such as an automobile, recreational vehicle, truck, etc. An often asked question is whether the other station is base or mobile. A mobile unit has much more limited range than a base station at some permanent location with a higher antenna.

Monster Lane: The passing lane of an interstate highway, also known as the "Fifty Dollar Lane."

Modulate (with): To hold a conversation over a CB radio channel. "It's been nice modulation' with you." Derived from a radio term which means to superimpose a voice signal on a carrier signal.

Motion-Lotion: Gasoline or diesel fuel.

Moveable Parking Lot: An automobile carrier.

Mud Duck: A weak station. "Got a Mud Duck trying to squeeze through all that chatter."



November

Negative Copy: To tell another you did not receive or could not copy, his signal. "That's a negative copy. Come again."

Negatory: No, or negative. Used In place of "negative" for greater clarity.

Nickel Channel: Channel five.



Oscar

OM: Acronym for "Old Man," which could refer either to a husband or to one's father. Originally a Ham term.

On Channel: On frequency.

On the Side: Standing by.

One Time: When a brief exchange is desired on a channel already in use, a call may be made as follows: "Break for that Annie Fannie one time."

One-Way Camper: An ambulance.

Over: End of transmission.

Over The Shoulder: To be behind or at the back door.

kojak with a kodak"= unmarked state trooper with a radar gun
"care bear"= officer assisting motorist in distress
"bed sled"= a truck from a moving company

Papa

Panty Hose Junction: A Restaurant or truck stop with a waitress.

Parking Lot: an inter-city expressway

Peanut Butter In The Ears: A reference to a CBers who either does not have his rig turned on, or cannot hear for some other reason

Plain Wrapper: Unmarked police patrol car.

Play Dead: To stand by "play dead, Pink Panther, we got ourselves a breaker.'

Portable Barnyard: A truck hauling cattle or live-stock.

Postholes, A Load Of: An empty truck.

Pounds: Watts you are putting out.

Prescription: Anything not done according to FCC rules.

Pull the Plug: To get off the air or sign off. "I'm going to pull the plug here."

Pumpkin: A flat tire.

Putting On (out): Used when talking about the amount of power that your transmitter is putting out.



Quebec

QSL Card: A card exchanged by CB and ham operators with whom they communicated with and received transmissions from.



Romeo

Radar Alley: Probably derived from Torpedo Alley during World War 11. The name of Radar Alley, however, aptly applies to the Ohio Turnpike (1-90) that is heavily patrolled by bears. They're avid picture-takers who collect lots of green stamps.

Radio Check: A radio interchange in which the purpose is to provide one of the participants with information about how well his signal is being transmitted. Usually the transmitter output is read in pounds (S-meter units). A general call to anyone to provide this service might be: "Break one-nine for a radio check."

Rake the Leaves: The last vehicle in a convoy that watches for police coming up from the rear. See "Back Door."

Ratchet law: A person who talks too much or continuously.

Read: To hear and understand, used interchangeably with "copy." "I read you" and "That's a copy" acknowledge clear and understandable reception of the message.

Red Lights: Brake lights seen on an expressway, especially after it has become a parking lot.

Reefer: A refrigerated truck.

Rig: A CB operators transceiver.

Riot Squad: An unhappy group of neighbors who have television interference (TVI) caused by a radio transmitter in their area - usually that of a ham or CBer.

Rocking Chair: Vehicle between the front and back doors. "You're at the front door, he's at the back, and I'm sitting in the rocking chair." All this person has to do is sit back and listen for Smokey reports coming from the front and rear of the traffic line.

Roger: Popularly known through air force and other war films, the term is synonymous with message received and understood, "copy," and "ten-four."

Roger Beep: A CB&#8217;s signaling tone device.

Rolling Refinery: A truck hauling gasoline or oil.

Roller Skate: A small car.



Sierra

Sandwich lane: Middle lane on a highway.

Savages: Channel hoggers, also known as "goon squad" or "cartel."

Scale House: A truck weigh station. See "Chicken Coop."

Seat Covers. A woman with a nice pair of legs. Usually, a "nice pair of seat covers." Truckers sit high in their cabs, and they see lots of other things as well.

Seventy-three: To send "best regards." An abbreviation originally used by hams, now often expressed by CBers as "threes." Often used in conjunction with "eights" (love and kisses), an abbreviation of eighty-eight.

Shake the Trees: The lead vehicle in a convoy shakes the trees - looks for police ahead. See also "Rake the Leaves."

Shaky Side: Truckers' term for the earthquake-prone side of the country, otherwise known as California. No, the East Coast is not known as the Steady Side, but rather the Dirty Side.

Shanty Shaker: A tractor for moving mobile homes.

Shout: Synonymous with an equally used term, holler. Shout and holler both mean to call another CBer. "I'll give you a shout on the f lip-f (op." It has nothing to do with volume.

Side, On The: To go on standby, listening to what's going on but not transmitting. Often coupled with ten-ten (transmission completed, subject to call) to indicate the operator will respond to a call for him.

Skip: A game played with the FCC meaning to communicate with stations more than 150 miles away by means of radio frequency waves that bounce (skip) off the ionosphere. If the FCC wins this game, you lose your license, and, most likely, some cash.

Skyhook: Originally an amateur radio term for antenna, still used by hams who also operate CB rigs. The more common CB terms are "ears" or "flappers"

Slave Drivers: Another of the many terms meaning a group of CBers who try to control a channel.

Slider. An illegal device for CBers since all Citizens' Radio equipment must be crystal controlled. A slider is a :variable frequency oscillator (VFO) which can slide across a range of frequencies.

Smoke: As in "How much smoke are we throwin'?" Essentially translates to the amount of power output and quality of signal reception.

Smokey (Smokey Bear): State police officer who generally wears a Smokey the Bear style ranger hat.

Smokey on Rubber: A state patrolman on the move (rolling on his rubber tires).

Snooperscope: Related to the periscope but referring to an illegally high CB antenna.

Snowshoes: Use of an illegal linear amplifier to increase the output power beyond the legal limits. One "wears snowshoes."

Stage Stop: A truck stop.

State Trooper Cage: State Police headquarters.

Step Up; Step Down: To go up or down to another channel. Used when moving to another channel because of overcrowding.

Streaking To go full speed.

Sunbeam: When things are rather gloomy on a channel, you're grateful for the sunbeam who comes along with a bright, lively conversation.



Tango

Take (taking) Pictures: To operate a radar unit measuring the speed of vehicles, Various police officers - Smokies, county mounties, and local yokels - are fond of taking pictures.

Tear Jerker: From a long-standing slang term, but applied to the person' rather than the story. A person with hard luck stories. Also see "sunbeam."

Ten-Four: Frequently used ten-code acknowledgment that a transmission has been received and understood. A "big ten-f our" means the received message is agreed with by the recipient.

Ten-Roger: See "ten-four" and "roger".

Thermos Bottle: A tanker truck, especially one carrying chemicals under pressure or refrigeration.

Threes: Short for seventy-three's, a term meaning "regards."

Throwing: The act of transmitting, usually used with "pounds" in regard to the power of the signal. "How many pounds am I throwing?"

Tightening up The Rubberband: To accelerate, also known as "Putting the Hammer Down."

Tijuana Taxi: A marked State Police car with lights and antenna.

Trip, The: The distance between the transmitter and the receiver, usually in reference to how strong the signal is: "How am I making the trip?" Also see "putting on" and "throwing."

Turn Twenty: The location of an exit or turn. "Twenty" refers to location. Twenty. Often as in "What's your twenty?" An abbreviation of the ten code meaning "What's your location." Frequently used to establish how far communicating stations are for the purpose of determining the effectiveness of the transmission.



Uniform

Up There, Down There: Not to be confused with the British television series "Upstairs, Downstairs." Up there refers to a higher numbered CB channel, and down there to a lower channel. Also see "Step Up, Step Down."



Victor

Vertical: Vertical ground plane antenna.

Vertical Side: Vertical polarization.

VFO: Variable frequency oscillator. Enables an operator to select any frequency within a band on which to transmit. Used by hams, but illegal for CBers.





Whisky

Walked On (over): To have a signal interfered with by another signal, effectively preventing it from being understood. "Come again, Blue Knight, someone just walked on you." See also "Step On."

Walking All Over You: Another louder station is covering up your signal.

Walking Tall: Good sounding signal.

Walking The Dog: Talking over a long distance.

Wallpaper: One or more QSL cards usually hung on a wall.

Wall to Wall: There are two widely used meanings for this- One refers to loud and clear reception: "You're coming in wall to wall." The other refers to a remarkable number of police in a given area, such as Radar Alley: "Mercy, good buddy, the Bears here are wall to wall."

Watch Your Donkey: Warning to move (drive) cautiously because of state or local police coming up from the rear.

Waving a hand: Telling someone hello; or asking someone to pass on your hello. "Tell Big Daddy that Shorty is waving a hand at him."

Wheels. "We're on wheels" means the operator in question is in a vehicle.
"
Wind Jammer. A long-winded radio operator.

Wrapper. The paint color of a vehicle, usually a four-wheeler, used to identify a specific vehicle. "There's a bear in a blue wrapper sittin' at marker one-two-four." Also see "plain wrapper."



X-Ray

X-Ray Machine: Radar equipment of local or state police. See also "Picture-Taker" and "Camera."

XYL: An abbreviation for ex-young-lady, or wife. Originally an amateur term, its common equivalent is OW (old woman).



Yankee

YL: Abbreviation for young lady. Once married, they become XYL's or OW's.

You Got'Em: Acknowledgment that the person called is responding.



Zulu

Zulu: The last letter in the Phonetic Alphabet



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